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21
Electronics / Re: $50 dollar robot not working.
« Last post by cyberjeff on July 31, 2015, 09:04:06 AM »
:) Hello!
CyberJeffs' statement;
I haven't built a $50 robot, nor will I.
This is so true, and reflects the choice of the person in relation to the products provided.
A lot of people would rather buy a Raspberry Pi for $35, a Parallax basic stamp for approx. $50 or less,
or any number of ardinu processor products compared to the price of the Axon; not to mention the
ease of use for those products, plus the power and support.
I have not programmed the Axon yet, because of my learning curve. :o
So, why should you buy an Axon, when you have more power, cheaper, and support with the other products?
The Axon board is a good design, and the processor line is a stable one. The Axon can do (I believe)
a lot more functions when clever programming is applied. The software has a simulator and uses
C++ language. The Axon is a gateway to the whole Atmel line of processors, and your software
can program them all, provided you have an STK600 to program them. I have found these processors
virtually everywhere, which gives a lot of uses. The smaller MCU are dirt cheap, $.5 - $1, and are
pretty powerfull for that size.
Ultimately, it is up to the user to create the masterpiece of Ex-machina, and is up to the people in this forum to try to participate in the Axon robotic construction. Other products illustrate a lot of programming capabilities on their products; HOWEVER, it seems that they have half of the whole world
programming their products, and giving that software away FREE. That is a lot of competition, but does
not diminish the potential power of the Axon,  8)  given the perspective I have indicated. What do you think?

I have no quibble with the hardware, it is the ancient software in the $50 robot. I read through it and could not figure out servo instructions. The Servo lib abstracts this very well, but wasn't available in '07.

As far as the Axon, it seems like a great product, particularlysince it has RF communications built in. Considering that is an add on for almost  everything else, it is a great deal.

I would think that the Axon line is well suited to most robotic projects, Kudos to them!

With that said, my little project requires a great deal of processing and the much faster processor in the Due was my choice.

The Pi is an entirely different animal (a microprocessor rather than a microcontroller) and I see no reason that a Pi could not work hand in hand with an Axon or an Arduino. At least that is my thinking, with the Pi handling the intelligence a microcontroller handling  the mechanics.

Learning curves always exist. I don't write in C++ so learning how it works has been a chore I am working on. With any new language there is usually a couple weeks where not much gets done and it takes months before some fluency. It  is just the way it is. Multidimensional arrays in C++ have taken me a while to absorb.

I work a little different than most people. I really don't desire to do something that has already been done, so wheeled robots hold no interest. Neither do I have an interest in humanoids as they are widely worked on. Nor do I have much interest in speed or robot battles.

Whatever holds your interest, it is a great time for robotics. There is a wide variety of hardware that can be bought or printed. The processors are cheap and the software is fairly mature. And yet we are still on the doorstep of a world where robotics and artificial intelligence will be prevalent.

I'm running with it. My best to you and your project.
22
Electronics / Re: $50 dollar robot not working.
« Last post by mklrobo on July 31, 2015, 07:10:30 AM »
 :) Hello!
CyberJeffs' statement;
I haven't built a $50 robot, nor will I.
This is so true, and reflects the choice of the person in relation to the products provided.
A lot of people would rather buy a Raspberry Pi for $35, a Parallax basic stamp for approx. $50 or less,
or any number of ardinu processor products compared to the price of the Axon; not to mention the
ease of use for those products, plus the power and support.
I have not programmed the Axon yet, because of my learning curve. :o
So, why should you buy an Axon, when you have more power, cheaper, and support with the other products?
The Axon board is a good design, and the processor line is a stable one. The Axon can do (I believe)
a lot more functions when clever programming is applied. The software has a simulator and uses
C++ language. The Axon is a gateway to the whole Atmel line of processors, and your software
can program them all, provided you have an STK600 to program them. I have found these processors
virtually everywhere, which gives a lot of uses. The smaller MCU are dirt cheap, $.5 - $1, and are
pretty powerfull for that size.
Ultimately, it is up to the user to create the masterpiece of Ex-machina, and is up to the people in this forum to try to participate in the Axon robotic construction. Other products illustrate a lot of programming capabilities on their products; HOWEVER, it seems that they have half of the whole world
programming their products, and giving that software away FREE. That is a lot of competition, but does
not diminish the potential power of the Axon,  8)  given the perspective I have indicated. What do you think?
23
Electronics / Re: $50 dollar robot not working.
« Last post by cyberjeff on July 31, 2015, 05:39:00 AM »
What about the Photoresistors, any ideas why it isn't quite working?
Because if the servos aren't the problem, I honestly run out of idea as to why this thing won't chase light.
I soldered the pphoto cells correctly as shown in the tutorial (even went ahead and did it twice for accuracy)
Can this be an Atmega problem or programming/software problem. Or even a photoresistor problwm?
 
The servos stop at 90

I haven't built a $50 robot, nor will I.

I did look at the code and it is quite old, circa 2007. There is a commonly used Servo lib, but it wasn't written until 2009.

So, I have to ask: Why are you building this? Few people need robots that chase light, so I would think  that it is because you want to learn how to program a robot.

Is that correct?

This was very clever code, but  it isn't 2007 anymore. Programming servos is done differently these days, there are established libraries for servos and analog read for the photo sensors. To rewrite this is not difficult.

What do you want to do?
24
Mechanics and Construction / Re: Help needed to construct my First Robot
« Last post by rahavoc on July 31, 2015, 03:37:02 AM »
I have a TowerPro SG 90 Micro Servo Motor.
Can you please tell how to rotate it using PWM method,I am using Atmega 16.
25
Electronics / Re: $50 dollar robot not working.
« Last post by Plague on July 30, 2015, 09:43:39 PM »
What about the Photoresistors, any ideas why it isn't quite working?
Because if the servos aren't the problem, I honestly run out of idea as to why this thing won't chase light.
I soldered the pphoto cells correctly as shown in the tutorial (even went ahead and did it twice for accuracy)
Can this be an Atmega problem or programming/software problem. Or even a photoresistor problwm?
 
The servos stop at 90
26
Electronics / Re: Why isn't the switch for my robot working?
« Last post by cyberjeff on July 30, 2015, 09:43:07 PM »
A voltohmeter would tell you if the switch was shorted, but shorted switches are  unlikely.

It would seem to me that there was a flaw in you wiring.
27
Electronics / Re: $50 dollar robot not working.
« Last post by cyberjeff on July 30, 2015, 09:37:18 PM »
I'm unsure what you are doing but I think:

You modified the Servo so that it is continuous rotation.

I have not done that, but... If you did not set the servo to neutral before you modified, the potentiometer might not be centered, so it would rotate. I would see if you can adjust it so it stops rotating while you have it set for neutral (90).

I suspect that the Arduino is OK.
28
Electronics / $50 dollar robot not working.
« Last post by Plague on July 30, 2015, 12:14:41 PM »
Okay, so I purchased another Atmega8-16pu because, after trying to fix the other other one, I concluded that it is probably fried.
Using AVR dude  and an Arduino as an isp i was able to successfully load the hex file onto the new Atmega8-16pu without any problem. But when i place the chip in my 50 dollar robot circuit, only the servos spin, continuously. When I introduced light to it, nothing happened the servo kept spining the same way they were spining. I also used the ardunio to check if the photocells were working properly. It gave me values for dark and bright so I think the photocells are fine. Also the circuit is up there in the original question if anyone want to take a look.
What could possibly be wrong. Or should i again purchase another Amtega, because this one might be faulty (Got it from EBAY)? 

If it may be of help i was thinking maybe the way I modified the servos could be the problem? I used a sketch from the arduino forums to modify the servo.
#include <Servo.h> // include the Servo library

// create the servo objects
Servo leftMotor;
Servo rightMotor;

void setup()
{
  leftMotor.attach(13);  // attaches the servo on pin 13 to a servo object
  rightMotor.attach(12); // attaches the servo on pin 12 to a servo object

}

void loop()
{
  leftMotor.write(0);  // 90 is neutral, so neither of the servos should turn
  rightMotor.write(90);
}

HELP!!!!!!!!!!! SO I CAN COMPLETE IT!!! All solutions are welcomed. Also I have tested the circuit and everything is fine.
Be as detailed as possible when giving me solutions, IM a beginner to all this. ;D
29
Electronics / Why isn't the switch for my robot working?
« Last post by w31ha0 on July 30, 2015, 10:26:11 AM »
Hi,

I've tried building a robot and everything seems fine except for the switch. The motor keeps running even though I've tried turning the switch off.
The pictures are as shown:

Overview:


Zoomed




Any possible reasons why the switch may not be working? Thanks
30
Electronics / Re: Can I connect jumper leads to solder onto a simple dc motor?
« Last post by cyberjeff on July 30, 2015, 08:18:09 AM »
Shields are usually used to connect motors. You may also see that as a motor controller. Google that.

If  this is all new to you, you may wish to start with an Arduino as there are many off the shelf plug in boards that require no soldering.

The point I wish to make is that neither the Pi or any of the microcontrollers like an Arduino has enough current to drive a motor directly. It will need an interface to protect it and to supply enough current.
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