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91
You can use an Arduino as brains.

You will also need a motor controller to boost the current to be used by the motor, and then you can implement feedback using your force or current sensor.  Some motor controllers have built in current sensors, so that would give you easy monitoring.

You can measure current, rather then force, because the amount of force an actuator can output is proportional to the current input. One thing you have to be aware of when programming is that when the actuator starts, there will be a current spike to get the motor going.  You'll need to program a slight delay to skip that, else your max current limits will be  wrong.
92
Mechanics and Construction / Re: Need help to pick right components for my first robot
« Last post by Dar0n on August 06, 2015, 02:45:06 PM »
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They are called servos. Here is a database:

http://www.servodatabase.com/

You need a digital and probably coreless. What the gear is made out of will affect lash, durabilty (under stress/shock) and wear. Durability, since you have little weight, is not a concern.

Accuracy depends on a myriad of things including gear lash in your mechanism.

You can multiply the "fineness" of the servo by gearing it down.

I have limited experience with robotics and none with linear actuators (you will probably build your own out of actobotics) so specific recommendations I can not give. Whether anyone else will weigh in is in doubt. I suggest you browse around.

Thank you for your help, of course I will browse around more. At least now I have a very common idea of what I want:)

Anyway, if somebody knows the device that provides alignment in 2 directions at the same moment - please, reply:) And, of course, if you have some other suggestions on the topic - I will be glad to hear other opinions.
93
They are called servos. Here is a database:

http://www.servodatabase.com/

You need a digital and probably coreless. What the gear is made out of will affect lash, durabilty (under stress/shock) and wear. Durability, since you have little weight, is not a concern.

Accuracy depends on a myriad of things including gear lash in your mechanism.

You can multiply the "fineness" of the servo by gearing it down.

I have limited experience with robotics and none with linear actuators (you will probably build your own out of actobotics) so specific recommendations I can not give. Whether anyone else will weigh in is in doubt. I suggest you browse around.
94
Misc / Re: Analyzing the Axon series: Coding, Construction, and Contraptions
« Last post by mklrobo on August 06, 2015, 10:32:38 AM »
Analyzing the Axon Series: What is this thing?
Other products have been introduced, that (it seems) most of the world is using, one
in particular, the ardunio boards. I looked at the ardunio boards, and they ALL use
Atmel processors. These processors are made by the same company that make the Atmega
for the Axon. It seems logical to assume that the AVR Studio 6 may be able to program
those Ardunio boards.(?) This is yet, another reason to stick with the Axon. There is a Atmel simulator
in the AVR Studio 6 which may enable a programmer to program in any Atmel processor, before
they even use it.  ;D
There are programs written for the Raspberry Pi that is used with the Ardunio boards, so it may not be
too much of a stretch to say that these programs may be able to be used with the Axon. This would
free up any Axon programmer for this task.
Using the Raspberry Pi as the brains, the axon for member control, it may be a "snap" to make a huminoid
robot, especially with the batteries available; Powerplus - 13600 Mah battery with 500 ampere peak current
output. depending on your robot, 5 of these (65 amps per hour!) could run your "terminator" robot!!!  8)
95
Misc / HGR Industrial Surplus - Used Industrial Robots/Parts
« Last post by PTD on August 06, 2015, 08:15:15 AM »
We currently have in stock over 140 robotic items, from full industrial robots to parts, controllers, etc. that members of the forum may find useful.  You may follow this link for additional information: http://bit.ly/1CbzAen
96
Mechanics and Construction / Re: Need help to pick right components for my first robot
« Last post by Dar0n on August 06, 2015, 06:53:15 AM »
After some searching I realized that I probably need some linear actuator as a component C. Also I could combine 2 RC servo motors as A component, but it would be better to use 1 part instead of 2. So, maybe there is some device that can provide horizontal alignment.
Quote
The weight I plan to put on the bottom of A component is really nothing - it's a mettalic plate 1mm height and 1cm diameter. I assume it weights several dozens of grams.
I just checked - the mass of sample in fact is less than 1 gram, so the total mass linear actuator will have to lift is only the mass of device itself.
Can anyone advise something according to requirements above mentioned?
97
Mechanics and Construction / Re: Need help to pick right components for my first robot
« Last post by Dar0n on August 06, 2015, 04:08:38 AM »
I would prefer to build it out of the actobotics details.
So, what is common accuracy for such motors? And, btw, how are they called correctly?:)
98
Electronics / Bluetooth robot control
« Last post by Joseph Thurlow on August 06, 2015, 03:09:59 AM »
I haven't heard of FPV before,but it looks like a good option in the way of streaming video.

Thanks for your help.  ;)
99
Mechanics and Construction / Re: My Advanced Realistic Humanoid Robot Project
« Last post by cyberjeff on August 05, 2015, 06:32:20 PM »
My knowledge of physiology is weak.  The muscle structure of the human body is complex, it seems to me that there are for some joints so many degrees of motion possible and that some compromises will of necessity have to be made.

With that said, you seem to be moving along and more power to you.

I have done some casting with silicone, it is superior to latex in many ways and I assume that whatever has been done in latex, and that is extensive would also be doable in silicone. I meant that as encouragement...

As far as servos, my little project which has limited degrees of motion is up to 12 servos for the arms and legs, yours is considerably more involved. I await to see how all those servos will fit in!
100
Quote
But, we have two unknowns which may make this very expensive. How much weight and how accurate?
The weight I plan to put on the bottom of A component is really nothing - it's a mettalic plate 1mm height and 1cm diameter. I assume it weights several dozens of grams.
What exactly do you mean by accuracy - angles or vertical positioning? Again, I can only assume, but I think, for angles accuracy up to 1 degree is enough(in both directions). For vertical positioning the more accurate the better:) I think 0,1-0,3mm is good enough.
Quote
3D printers are now widely available, they are highly accurate. On the hobby scale they can't handle much weight.

3D printers need the same 3 axis that you need here, kits of just the mechanical parts are available, or you can build it out of the actobotics. A tenth of a mm is pretty tight. If the scale of the machine is small you can gear it down to gain  accuracy.
Do I understand correctly that you suggest me to use 3D-printer to make backbone for my device?
As for programming, I think C++ is better for me. I'm not a programmer, but I had a course on it and learnt some basics.
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