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Author Topic: Driving stepper motor with Arduino and SN754410NE  (Read 5440 times)

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Offline roborgTopic starter

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Driving stepper motor with Arduino and SN754410NE
« on: May 07, 2010, 12:26:01 AM »
Hi,

I am using the circuit diagram in http://arduino.cc/en/Reference/StepperBipolarCircuit (4-pin one) to control my stepper motor. However, nothing seems to be happening when I tried it out. Here is how I connected the pins, can you please validate these connections ?

1) 1,2 en pin, 3,4 en pin and V1 are all connected to pin marked as 5V on Arduino
2) 1in, 2in connected to digital pins 2 and 3 on Arduino
3) 3in, 4in connected to digital pins 4 and 5 on Arduino
4) All 4 GND pins go to GND on breadboard (which in turn was connected to GND pin on Arduino)
5) 1 out, 2out, 3 out, 4 out are connected to motor. My motor has cables labeled as 1, 2, 3 and 4 so I just connected them in that order.
6) V2 is connected to pin marked as 5v. This is probably a big assumption I made ... I don't actually know what voltage my motor operates on as I bought it in a hobby shop and there are not data sheets for it but I am making a guess here. The motor face plate has the following:

Portescap
Malaysia
S15M020N28
0403

I googled a bit but didn't find anything. I checked their website and they don't have any stepper motors that match this. Can someone help ? Regarding the connections, other than 6) does everything else look fine ? BTW, where can I find cheap and small stepper motors ? I don't care about its torque or other things as long as I can make it rotate (just for fun) with 5vdc. I see that steppers are somewhat expensive.

The Arduino sketch I tried is:

#include <Stepper.h>

#define STEPS 5  // not sure about this value, just a guess

Stepper stepper(STEPS, 2, 3, 4, 5);

void setup() {
   pinMode(2, OUTPUT);
   pinMode(3, OUTPUT);
   pinMode(4, OUTPUT);
   pinMode(5, OUTPUT);
   stepper.setSpeed(10);    // again, 10 is randomly chosen
}

void loop()
{
 stepper.step(10);             // randomly chosen
 delay(10000);                  // wait for 10 seconds
}

Thanks,
RO.

Offline Soeren

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Re: Driving stepper motor with Arduino and SN754410NE
« Reply #1 on: May 07, 2010, 01:11:56 AM »
Hi,

6) V2 is connected to pin marked as 5v. This is probably a big assumption I made ... I don't actually know what voltage my motor operates on as I bought it in a hobby shop and there are not data sheets for it but I am making a guess here. The motor face plate has the following:

Portescap
Malaysia
S15M020N28
0403

I googled a bit but didn't find anything. I checked their website and they don't have any stepper motors that match this. Can someone help ?
Google can.
Here and Here are some data. Plenty more to be found

There's datasheets on this page

You just need to cut down the "S15M020N28". It's telling different things about the motor. I am not sure, but the initial S might stand for "Stepper" (just a wild guess). "15" should be the diameter and "M020" and "N28" seems to refer to the motor type and type of winding, but that's guesswork as well.

I'm pretty sure that the one you have is a lot like like the one I linked to, even if the names have different prefixes, so it's likely a 5V stepper, 18°/step, but the torque is very different in the two I linked to (8.8 oz/in and 0.55 oz/in respectively). It may be due to differences in how they're wound, which will affect torque.

The last line "0403" is a date code and only tells you that it was produced either in March 2004 or April 2003 - with the latter being the most likely (or it could be the 4th. week of 2003), no way of telling how they code it.

If you choose to search on, just search for "15M020" as a starting point - "Malaysia" only tells you where the motor is manufactured, but it's still a German product.

Regards,
Søren

A rather fast and fairly heavy robot with quite large wheels needs what? A lot of power?
Please remember...
Engineering is based on numbers - not adjectives

Offline roborgTopic starter

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Re: Driving stepper motor with Arduino and SN754410NE
« Reply #2 on: May 07, 2010, 01:24:39 PM »
Hi,

6) V2 is connected to pin marked as 5v. This is probably a big assumption I made ... I don't actually know what voltage my motor operates on as I bought it in a hobby shop and there are not data sheets for it but I am making a guess here. The motor face plate has the following:

Portescap
Malaysia
S15M020N28
0403

I googled a bit but didn't find anything. I checked their website and they don't have any stepper motors that match this. Can someone help ?
Google can.
Here and Here are some data. Plenty more to be found

There's datasheets on this page

You just need to cut down the "S15M020N28". It's telling different things about the motor. I am not sure, but the initial S might stand for "Stepper" (just a wild guess). "15" should be the diameter and "M020" and "N28" seems to refer to the motor type and type of winding, but that's guesswork as well.

I'm pretty sure that the one you have is a lot like like the one I linked to, even if the names have different prefixes, so it's likely a 5V stepper, 18°/step, but the torque is very different in the two I linked to (8.8 oz/in and 0.55 oz/in respectively). It may be due to differences in how they're wound, which will affect torque.

The last line "0403" is a date code and only tells you that it was produced either in March 2004 or April 2003 - with the latter being the most likely (or it could be the 4th. week of 2003), no way of telling how they code it.

If you choose to search on, just search for "15M020" as a starting point - "Malaysia" only tells you where the motor is manufactured, but it's still a German product.



Thanks a lot Soeren, I didn't know I have to break down S15M020N28. I was just searching for it as a whole.

Thanks,
RO.

Offline roborgTopic starter

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Re: Driving stepper motor with Arduino and SN754410NE
« Reply #3 on: May 07, 2010, 01:55:10 PM »
One more thing about this motor is that it is a dual shaft stepper motor. What does it mean whey they say a motor is brushless ?

Thanks,
RO.

Offline Cristi_Neagu

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Re: Driving stepper motor with Arduino and SN754410NE
« Reply #4 on: May 07, 2010, 02:32:39 PM »
Normal DC motors have a permanent magnet stator (the housing, more or less) and a coil rotor (the shaft). Power is delivered to the coil via brushes made out of carbon. The drawback of these motors is that the brushes get worn and need replacing. Also, while wearing down, they spread a fine charcoal dust which plays havoc on lubrication and, since charcoal is conductive, on the electronics as well.

So they came up with brushless motors. These have a coil stator and a permanent magnet rotor, thus not needing brushes to pass power to the coil.

Stepper motors are always brushless because of the number of different coils involved. While DC motors have a single coil (even tough it might be divided into a couple of coils, tied in series), stepper motors have at least 2. There are also models with 4 and 5 coils. Using brushes to pass current to the coils is just too complicated.

Offline Soeren

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Re: Driving stepper motor with Arduino and SN754410NE
« Reply #5 on: May 07, 2010, 06:39:40 PM »
Hi,

Normal DC motors have a permanent magnet stator (the housing, more or less) and a coil rotor (the shaft). Power is delivered to the coil via brushes made out of carbon. The drawback of these motors is that the brushes get worn and need replacing. Also, while wearing down, they spread a fine charcoal dust which plays havoc on lubrication and, since charcoal is conductive, on the electronics as well.
And they generate wideband noise and have a power loss (i.e. lowered efficiency) due to the commutation.
Brushes are made from several other materials than carbon (I doubt that they use plain carbon these days at all). Some have copper brushes (plated or clad with a precious metal for low current motors), others have a carbon/copper composite (high current motors).
The idea of using precious metals in low current motors is to keep the contact surfaces clean, as the current may be to low to be self cleaning.
The composite brushes are much better conductors than oldfashioned graphite brushes.


Regards,
Søren

A rather fast and fairly heavy robot with quite large wheels needs what? A lot of power?
Please remember...
Engineering is based on numbers - not adjectives

 


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