Author Topic: 16-Pin DIP  (Read 2006 times)

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Offline LeftHandRoboticsTopic starter

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16-Pin DIP
« on: July 12, 2010, 05:05:40 PM »
Hey guys, I'm trying to assemble a PCB that came with my robot book.  It asks for several things that I can't seem to find.  I've looked them up on yahoo and google, as well as a couple of the robot shops and cant seem to find them. 
*the first and maybe most important are two "220 v 16-Pin resistor DIPs"
*the second is a "twenty-four-pin, .600-inch sockets"
*"single-row, 32-pin pcb mount socket"
*"pcb mount, female 9-pin d-shell connector" I figured that this was like the connector on my laptop that has two rows of 5 and 4 wholes for pins to be inserted.
*lastly a "CKN9009 momentary push-button switch"
the book is "123 robotics experiments for the evil genuis" its by predko, author of robot builder's bonanza and I think this book is actually better than bonanza, except sometimes I'm not sure where to buy the materials.

Thanks guys,
~Lefty

Offline waltr

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Re: 16-Pin DIP
« Reply #1 on: July 12, 2010, 06:48:37 PM »
Check those description in DigiKey.com.

Here is the switch:
http://search.digikey.com/scripts/DkSearch/dksus.dll?lang=en&site=US&WT.z_homepage_link=hp_go_button&KeyWords=CKN9009&x=0&y=0

Socket
http://search.digikey.com/scripts/DkSearch/dksus.dll?vendor=0&keywords=24-pin+sockets

The 9pin D connect is like the Serial Com port connector on your PC, two rows of 5 & 4 pins.
http://search.digikey.com/scripts/DkSearch/dksus.dll?Selection

The other you will need to play with what words you use to search for. You also don't need to buy these from DigiKey, although you could, but use DigiKey to get pictures, data sheets and further descriptions of the parts you,re looking for.

Offline billhowl

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Re: 16-Pin DIP
« Reply #2 on: July 12, 2010, 08:44:47 PM »

Offline LeftHandRoboticsTopic starter

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Re: 16-Pin DIP
« Reply #3 on: July 13, 2010, 02:00:20 PM »
Thanks guys for your help, you have no idea how many times I've done different variations of searches with google/yahoo.  I ended up just calling Digi-key sales reps about the 9-pin d-shell just to be safe, they were helpful.  I think I'm on my way to make my first bot.

Thanks again guys,

Lefty

Offline Y_Geo

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Re: 16-Pin DIP
« Reply #4 on: October 31, 2011, 09:56:48 AM »
Hi,
 I have had the same ordeal as the original poster, except I am familar with the components attributes BUT finding a UK source has been a nightmare.

MAPLIN has:-
 the 16 dip sockets as code BL19V but NOT the resistor networks DIP  it self (still looking for those)
24 pin 0.6" socket as FZ16R for the Basic Stamp 2                           (which also is not available here in the UK)
the Breadboard is AD102
32 Pin single in line PCB socket = DC17T

The touch switch CKN9009 is no longer made according to one source. & the PCB dimensions do not match any from other sources I have looked at.
 The PCB mounted serial port I had to buy out of CHINA .

Digikey seem unwilling to trade to the UK, anyone State side want to help out (payment by Pay Pal ) or anyone UK side know of source of the misssing bits?
 Thanks
Y-Geo.
CU
 Y-Geo.

Offline Soeren

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Re: 16-Pin DIP
« Reply #5 on: October 31, 2011, 07:32:01 PM »
Hi,

*the first and maybe most important are two "220 v 16-Pin resistor DIPs"

They're DIP resistor arrays, with a resistor from pin 1 to pin 16, the next one from pin 2 to pin 15 and so on.
The value is 220 Ohm - I'd think they go from I/O pins to either LED's, transistors or something like that, because a higher value would have been used for eg. a discrete D/A-C or pull ups/downs (and then it would have been smarter to go with the 9 pin SIL types where 8 resistors share a common pin).
If you need another value, check the entire selection at Rapid.

You can use separate resistors if needs be.


*the second is a "twenty-four-pin, .600-inch sockets"

Rapid


*"single-row, 32-pin pcb mount socket"

Might be this type or it may be this type - both from Rapid. The former is a 32 pin SIL socket, just like an IC socket and the latter is a female "pin" header, normally used for connecting sandwiched PCB's or connecting pins to (the book should reveal which it is, or drop Mike an email to clear this up). This only comes in a 40-way version (so it probably is the other kind), but it's very easy to cut down to 32 pins.


*"pcb mount, female 9-pin d-shell connector" I figured that this was like the connector on my laptop that has two rows of 5 and 4 wholes for pins to be inserted.

Yes, it's a standard (and somewhat obsolete these days) 9-pin D-Sub connector.
Rapid sports a good selection. I didn't see any right angle mount types, but here is their special deal (very cheap compared with their other types) in PCB mount versions.
If you need a right angle mount type, either get it from somewhere else (high street shop?) or get a solder lug version and use wire to make the connections.
(Don't mind the picture shows a 15 way plug. The page is for a 9 way socket).


*lastly a "CKN9009 momentary push-button switch"

This is the equivalent switch from Rapid - different name, but same pin spacing, button height etc.
Regards,
Søren

A rather fast and fairly heavy robot with quite large wheels needs what? A lot of power?
Please remember...
Engineering is based on numbers - not adjectives

Offline Soeren

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Re: 16-Pin DIP
« Reply #6 on: October 31, 2011, 07:39:08 PM »
Hi,

I have had the same ordeal as the original poster, except I am familar with the components attributes BUT finding a UK source has been a nightmare.
Yeah, Maplin isn't what it used to be.
I grabbed the original post, as other people may find it useful as well - just pick what of it you need.
Regards,
Søren

A rather fast and fairly heavy robot with quite large wheels needs what? A lot of power?
Please remember...
Engineering is based on numbers - not adjectives

 


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