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Author Topic: Our Muscles work on PWM  (Read 844 times)

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Offline macdad-Topic starter

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Our Muscles work on PWM
« on: October 06, 2010, 03:03:42 PM »
Interesting enough that I thought I might share it.

http://encyclopedia.stateuniversity.com/pages/21870/tetany.html
This happens during regular movements and holding a posture, to save on chemical energy(ATP for instance), our muscle fibers are constantly pulsed faster than we can notice them. Probably a good reason to get your tectnus shot.

Biological PWM?  8)
« Last Edit: October 06, 2010, 03:09:56 PM by macdad- »

Offline z.s.tar.gz

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Re: Our Muscles work on PWM
« Reply #1 on: October 06, 2010, 07:57:54 PM »
Makes sense.
Save yourself the typing. Just call me Zach.

Offline Soeren

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Re: Our Muscles work on PWM
« Reply #2 on: October 06, 2010, 09:58:35 PM »
Hi,

Biological PWM?  8)
A non robotics page where you have to sign up to read it?

Our muscles don't use PWM as we know it, but the electro-chemical feedback system will give correction signals whose magnitude is determined by the amount of correction needed, so in most instances may look that way - just standing upright, your brain, muscles and nerve system work really hard to keep your balance - might be why it's more tiring going shopping than a brisk walk (where much less brain and nerves are used to keep balance - walking is a constantly evaded fall).

An important part of keeping balance - your artificial horizon/reference actually - is the Eustachian tube in your middle ear. Flush your ears with first hot (not scolding!) and then cold water a few times and you'll feel like Tyson just punched you (less the pain), as you'll probably not be able to stand on your own two feet without falling (it's a test used to test for some kind of ear disorders).
The human body is a masterpiece and we're not going to be able to copy (or fully explain) it anytime soon.
Regards,
Søren

A rather fast and fairly heavy robot with quite large wheels needs what? A lot of power?
Please remember...
Engineering is based on numbers - not adjectives

Offline macdad-Topic starter

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Re: Our Muscles work on PWM
« Reply #3 on: October 07, 2010, 05:47:05 AM »
Heh, probably should have provided a different link, but yea it sound right.

 


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