Author Topic: Analog to Digital Signal question.  (Read 1001 times)

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Offline JMLStamp2pTopic starter

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Analog to Digital Signal question.
« on: March 02, 2011, 09:50:44 AM »
Good morning, I am new to the Axon and interested in it's Analog to Digital capabilitys. We use various instruments that output 1-10V DC, can the axon take this? I am using a 6VDC Battery array (2000 ma.) for power. Or does the analog signal in have to be between 1-5V DC, within battery voltage?

Thanks for the help,
JMLStamp2p

Offline Soeren

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Re: Analog to Digital Signal question.
« Reply #1 on: March 02, 2011, 01:56:27 PM »
Hi,

We use various instruments that output 1-10V DC, can the axon take this?
It has to be 0 to 5V (guess that's what you meant), but a resistive 1:1 voltage divider should do fine.
What's the output impedance of your circuits?
Regards,
Søren

A rather fast and fairly heavy robot with quite large wheels needs what? A lot of power?
Please remember...
Engineering is based on numbers - not adjectives

Offline JMLStamp2pTopic starter

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Re: Analog to Digital Signal question.
« Reply #2 on: March 03, 2011, 07:04:44 AM »
Thank you for your Reply, thats what I thought. I'm not sure of the Impedance, it is just a 1-5VDC to 4-20ma converter module.
John Logan.

Offline Soeren

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Re: Analog to Digital Signal question.
« Reply #3 on: March 03, 2011, 05:23:23 PM »
Hi,

I'm not sure of the Impedance, it is just a 1-5VDC to 4-20ma converter module.
Do you wanna replace the 1-5V to 4-20mA module?

If not, and if you got long leads, the 4-20mA is the better way to go, as the low impedance will be much less prone to noise pick-up.
At the receiving end, a resistor is all that's needed and it can be scaled to whatever max. voltage you need (5V here), as long as the driver can supply it.
An op-amp can make a 4-20mA (or 1-5V, or 1-10V) into 0-5V, if you need the full resolution of the D/A-C.

In your first post you said 1V-10V now you say 1V-5V?
Regards,
Søren

A rather fast and fairly heavy robot with quite large wheels needs what? A lot of power?
Please remember...
Engineering is based on numbers - not adjectives

 


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