go_away

Author Topic: Identify Motor  (Read 1249 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline wrinklesTopic starter

  • Beginner
  • *
  • Posts: 3
  • Helpful? 0
Identify Motor
« on: April 14, 2011, 02:37:16 PM »
I got this motor from a Xerox 8550. It's the Y-axis motor. I can't seem to find any specs for it. When I put a 9v DC voltage to it it twitches, I change it to AC and it does the same. It seems like it's vibrating but I see the shaft twitching back and forth.

Any ideas. I'm wanting to add this motor to a turntable that will need to turn at about 4rpm.




Uploaded with ImageShack.us

Offline BANE

  • Supreme Robot
  • *****
  • Posts: 639
  • Helpful? 4
  • E=roboticsC^2
Re: Identify Motor
« Reply #1 on: April 14, 2011, 05:53:05 PM »
Quote
I change it to AC and it does the same.
ive taken apart similar things and the motors are always DC.  personally, for a y-axis, id put money on DC because you would need direction control and speed control. 

 
Quote
9v DC voltage to it it twitches
My guess would be closer to 24-30v for a motor this size. 


the easiest method would be to power up the machine and use a muiltimeter on the motor pin out and try to jog the motor.  Also, take a look at the transformers voltage out put.  it will probably be something like 120v AC 1amp (in) and 30v DC 4amps.

cheers!

Offline knossos

  • Robot Overlord
  • ****
  • Posts: 278
  • Helpful? 14
Re: Identify Motor
« Reply #2 on: April 14, 2011, 06:23:57 PM »
Its a 12 or 24v motor.  If you look at the Buehler motor webpage, although not directly listed, you can see the options for motors they offer.

It looks like its a 1.13.054.xxx series motor.  Here is the datasheet.

It does not list the specific motor, but I would assume the specs are comparable.  When you hooked it up to 9VDC what were you using as a power source?  It looks like these can draw a decent amount of amps.

Also to drive a turntable at about 4 rpm, you will have to gear down substantially, it looks like it runs about 3000 rpm.
« Last Edit: April 14, 2011, 06:25:31 PM by knossos »
"Never regret thy fall,
O Icarus of the fearless flight
For the greatest tragedy of them all
Is never to feel the burning light."
 
— Oscar Wilde

Offline wrinklesTopic starter

  • Beginner
  • *
  • Posts: 3
  • Helpful? 0
Re: Identify Motor
« Reply #3 on: April 14, 2011, 06:47:46 PM »
Thanks for all the info. I'll have to look at the power supply for the printer to see what the power output is.
I was using a 9v 800ma power supply I also tried a 12 8ma power supply with the same results. I stripped a couple of stepper motors from the printer, I just didn't want to build a driver circuit for one of those. Might end up having to do that.

Offline wrinklesTopic starter

  • Beginner
  • *
  • Posts: 3
  • Helpful? 0
Re: Identify Motor
« Reply #4 on: April 14, 2011, 06:58:09 PM »
Thanks again. I tried a 21v 400ma power supply and the motor function perfectly. Knossos you were right the rpm are pretty high. Guess the stepper motor is my next choice.

Offline Soeren

  • Supreme Robot
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,672
  • Helpful? 227
  • Mind Reading: 0.0
Re: Identify Motor
« Reply #5 on: April 15, 2011, 09:23:41 PM »
Hi,

Industrial copiers (large office machines that weighs in at around 100lb or more) is always run on 24V (to keep currents down).

Usually the motors (whether DC or steppers) found in such devices won't be very usable for small robots, unless you find a particular fine specimen that would justify building a boost circuit, but that is rare, given the added complexity.

But put them aside for something else - one of them might be good for eg. a generator for a Savonius wind mill, or perhaps some stationary application.

For a 4 RPM turntable, a small motor with a couple of worm gears should do.
Regards,
Søren

A rather fast and fairly heavy robot with quite large wheels needs what? A lot of power?
Please remember...
Engineering is based on numbers - not adjectives

 


Get Your Ad Here