Author Topic: Current through stripboard?  (Read 951 times)

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Offline mstachoTopic starter

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Current through stripboard?
« on: July 05, 2011, 12:36:07 PM »
Hi all,

I have some 0.1" stripboard and I'm going to be using it as a power bus.  I need 6 connections to 6 motors, which are at 6V, and the total amount of current will be 1A, which is quite a bit for stripboard, so what I'm thinking of doing is this:

Put a common ground for all 6 motors, but split the 6V signal in parrallel so that only 3 motors are connected to a given strip.  That way, although the entire board is taking the 1A, no single strip is taking the full current, and the power through any given strip should be low enough not to melt it.

But my brain has encountered and error and will have to close: current into a circuit is the same as current out, so the common ground WILL have to handle the full amp of current, right?  Will the voltage drop across the motors be enough to avoid burning out the stripboard, or is it the current that matters and I'll need to rig up a few grounds in parallel as well?

MIKE
Current project: tactile sensing systems for multifingered robot hands

Offline Soeren

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Re: Current through stripboard?
« Reply #1 on: July 05, 2011, 12:57:13 PM »
Hi,

I have some 0.1" stripboard and I'm going to be using it as a power bus.  I need 6 connections to 6 motors, which are at 6V, and the total amount of current will be 1A, which is quite a bit for stripboard, [...]
(Quality) strip-board can handle 1A just fine.
If, on the board you have, the copper is a bit thin (or the holes don't leave much copper around them), tinning is the first step and soldering a wire (or some solder removal litz wire).

Put 1A through a board the length you need and measure the voltage over it (probe next to where the supply enters/exits, but touching only the bare copper in between).
I think you'll find it OK, even without tinning.
Regards,
Søren

A rather fast and fairly heavy robot with quite large wheels needs what? A lot of power?
Please remember...
Engineering is based on numbers - not adjectives

 


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