Author Topic: Looking for battery holder  (Read 874 times)

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Offline joe61Topic starter

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Looking for battery holder
« on: March 24, 2012, 06:57:06 PM »
I've got some of these left over from an old phone, and I'm thinking about how to use them. I haven't been able to locate a holder for it to use on a circuit board though. Anyone have a pointer? Google isn't being my friend.

Thanks

joe

Offline Soeren

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Re: Looking for battery holder
« Reply #1 on: March 24, 2012, 07:58:15 PM »
Hi,

Why not cut out the section of the relevant phone?
Or just make a flat frame/box that fits it and use some bronze contacts (either reuse those from the phone or bend some from foil strips - phosphor bronce was used extensively at the bottom of front doors, so if you have an oldfashioned hardware store near you, grab a length - it's handy for all kinds of contacts).
A length of elastic band and/or velcro will keep the battery in the frame.

You're not going to find a holder ready made for this battery, as it's a Nokia only product, but it's very easy to to make one yourself.
Regards,
Søren

A rather fast and fairly heavy robot with quite large wheels needs what? A lot of power?
Please remember...
Engineering is based on numbers - not adjectives

Offline joe61Topic starter

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Re: Looking for battery holder
« Reply #2 on: March 24, 2012, 09:05:34 PM »
I thought about that, but given the level of my dexterity with stuff like this I thought I'd see if I just missed it some where.

Would I need some kind of interface circuit for this to manage discharge, etc? Or can I just run + and - from the battery?

Thanks

Joe

Offline Soeren

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Re: Looking for battery holder
« Reply #3 on: March 24, 2012, 11:03:34 PM »
Hi,

I thought about that, but given the level of my dexterity with stuff like this I thought I'd see if I just missed it some where.
It doesn't take much dex to do - anything that can position and hold the battery in place against the contacts will do.

Some years ago, I bought a charger for "loose" lithium cells and it's made with a clamp that presses the battery onto the rest of the (wall wart like) charger and two moveable arms carry the contacts - I use it for phone and cam batteries and the like when I haven't got the proper charger, or the phone/whatever it belongs to. The two plastic+contact arms simply swings in an arc to adjust the center distance and then you jam the cell against the contacts and release the clamp.

Using matrix board for holding a couple of contacts, you could solder or glue small strips of PCB or plastic to form a rectangle - as long as it will hit the contacts (which you could always bend a bit) and stay in contact,it will work. a few strips of self adhesive window seal or similar may help it from sliding if the "frame" get's a little too large.


Would I need some kind of interface circuit for this to manage discharge, etc? Or can I just run + and - from the battery?
You need to detect (and stop discharging at) a suitable lower voltage, eg. 3.0V, but apart from that, it's plain sailing.
You'll need a charger made for it as well, unless you want to use a phone for that (or if you have one of the Nokia charging stands that takes an extra battery, that could be used).

Should it ever go below ~2.5-2.8V, use a low charge current until it reaches 3.0V

My GF got an SE Experia X10 Mini Pro from a friend, as he went with an iPhone. It had been lying in his drawer for around half a year and the battery was reading 0.00V, so I wasn't too optimistic, but on the other hand, you cannot kill a dead battery and by hand charging it with a lab supply (and some caution), I managed to necromance it to take a charge and while its age (a couple of years and down to around 70..80% of a new battery) shows, she's been using it every day for around a little over a month (and she plays games on it and fiddle with it a lot).

Only goes to show that all the voices who claims it impossible saving a cell that has gone under 2-point-something volts are just repeating what they read somewhere, without having neither any practical experience, nor a functional filter to sort the few percent of truth from all the rubbish that is floating around the web these days.  ::)
Regards,
Søren

A rather fast and fairly heavy robot with quite large wheels needs what? A lot of power?
Please remember...
Engineering is based on numbers - not adjectives

Offline jkerns

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Re: Looking for battery holder
« Reply #4 on: March 26, 2012, 01:12:16 PM »
I get paid to play with robots - can't beat that with a stick.

http://www.ltu.edu/engineering/mechanical/robotics_engineering.asp

 


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