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Author Topic: Sharp IR range sensor?  (Read 577 times)

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Offline chimpfunkzTopic starter

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Sharp IR range sensor?
« on: April 15, 2012, 01:02:19 AM »
Can anyone provide an explanation on how this sensor works, exactly?
« Last Edit: April 15, 2012, 01:15:49 AM by chimpfunkz »

Offline Soeren

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Re: Sharp IR range sensor?
« Reply #1 on: April 15, 2012, 06:15:57 AM »
Hi,

Can anyone provide an explanation on how this sensor works, exactly?
It emits pulses of infrared light and an array of photodetectors, with a lens in front, determines the angle at which it sees the core of the beam and "triangulates" from that.
Regards,
Søren

A rather fast and fairly heavy robot with quite large wheels needs what? A lot of power?
Please remember...
Engineering is based on numbers - not adjectives

Offline chimpfunkzTopic starter

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Re: Sharp IR range sensor?
« Reply #2 on: April 16, 2012, 02:44:27 PM »
Hi,


It emits pulses of infrared light and an array of photodetectors, with a lens in front, determines the angle at which it sees the core of the beam and "triangulates" from that.


Could I use this as a simple infrared sensor then? Say if I covered up the emitter then looked for any source of infrared (I know that this would no longer work as a distance sensor), but would it recognize that there is infrared light? I guess what I'm asking is if it is possible to use a sharp distance sensor as a infrared light receiver, and if so, is there any distances that would make it work/not work?

Also, what range of wavelengths do the Sharp sensors detect?

Offline Soeren

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Re: Sharp IR range sensor?
« Reply #3 on: April 19, 2012, 11:50:58 AM »
Hi,

Could I use this as a simple infrared sensor then? Say if I covered up the emitter then looked for any source of infrared (I know that this would no longer work as a distance sensor), but would it recognize that there is infrared light? I guess what I'm asking is if it is possible to use a sharp distance sensor as a infrared light receiver, and if so,
You could, but that's not saying that it's sensible, as it is very expensive compared to a regular photo transistor and it's extremely slow compared.

Why would you wanna do that at all?


is there any distances that would make it work/not work?
Yes... Experiment to find it :)


Also, what range of wavelengths do the Sharp sensors detect?
I've never seen that info in any datasheet and I probably never will, as it's extremely unrelated to conventional use. The emitter and the receiver array are matched of course.

If you really wanna know, get access to an IR spectrometer and test it with a range of IR LEDs from say 750nm to ~1000nm and then interpolate for the wavelengths you don't have LEDs for.
Regards,
Søren

A rather fast and fairly heavy robot with quite large wheels needs what? A lot of power?
Please remember...
Engineering is based on numbers - not adjectives

 


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