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Author Topic: H-Bridge ICs  (Read 681 times)

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Offline mstachoTopic starter

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H-Bridge ICs
« on: April 16, 2012, 07:26:58 AM »
Howdy all,

I'm wondering if anyone has any ideas on an H-Bridge IC I can use.  My application is just simple DC motor control, but I'd like to do it using only one PWM input and one digital IO pin for direction control, rather than two PWM inputs that most ICs seem to need.

I know I can do what I'm looking for with AND gates and NOT gates, so it's not a massive deal, but I wonder if anyone has any other suggestions?  I can't use breakout boards because I want to make this with a minimal amount of external wiring (although some great breakouts exist that I've used in the past to do this very thing).

MIKE
Current project: tactile sensing systems for multifingered robot hands

Offline billhowl

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Re: H-Bridge ICs
« Reply #1 on: April 16, 2012, 07:44:45 AM »
What is the voltage and current the DC motor need? how many motor for "only one PWM input and one digital IO pin for direction control"? is it two motors?

Offline mstachoTopic starter

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Re: H-Bridge ICs
« Reply #2 on: April 16, 2012, 07:48:17 AM »
7V, 0.2A.  Little motors, basically.  The L298 IC chip drives them pretty well now, but it's in a breakout board that implements the DIR/PWM stuff for me.

I don't mind having one H-Bridge chip for each motor.  I'm using one right now, in fact, but it needs two PWM inputs (apparently.  I'm up for being wrong on this :-P)

MIKE
Current project: tactile sensing systems for multifingered robot hands

Offline billhowl

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Re: H-Bridge ICs
« Reply #3 on: April 16, 2012, 08:07:18 AM »
What is the stall current? why not use the L293?

Offline mstachoTopic starter

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Re: H-Bridge ICs
« Reply #4 on: April 16, 2012, 08:09:05 AM »
Awesome, exactly what I was looking for.  Thanks!

MIKE
Current project: tactile sensing systems for multifingered robot hands

Offline ben23f

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Re: H-Bridge ICs
« Reply #5 on: April 19, 2012, 02:26:14 AM »
Hi just wondering what is the difference between this and the SN754410 from Texas Instruments? Thats what im using and all the pins are identical, is there any difference?

Offline infurl

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Re: H-Bridge ICs
« Reply #6 on: April 19, 2012, 05:12:36 AM »
According to the datasheets, the SN754410 can handle a continuous output current of 1.1 amps per channel (2 amps peak) and L293D can handle 600 mA per channel (1.2 amps peak).

Offline Soeren

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Re: H-Bridge ICs
« Reply #7 on: April 19, 2012, 10:33:39 PM »
Hi just wondering what is the difference between this and the SN754410 from Texas Instruments? Thats what im using and all the pins are identical, is there any difference?
The L293 (less a trailing D) handles 1A (2A peak), has got a shorter rise time and only use half the letters/numbers ;)
IOW, you'll observe practically no difference in average use.
Regards,
Søren

A rather fast and fairly heavy robot with quite large wheels needs what? A lot of power?
Please remember...
Engineering is based on numbers - not adjectives

 


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