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Author Topic: microcontroller pins  (Read 472 times)

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Offline morgmorgTopic starter

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microcontroller pins
« on: April 18, 2012, 06:43:44 PM »
I was wondering what each pin in the ic for the 50$ robot. I was also wondering if it was the same for diffrent ic's or how to find out what they do.

Offline mstacho

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Re: microcontroller pins
« Reply #1 on: April 19, 2012, 07:06:17 AM »
The one in the tutorial is the ATmega8.  Its datasheet can be found by googling "ATmega8 datasheet".  To save you the trouble: www.atmel.com/Images/doc2486.pdf  You would likely be using the "PDIP" package ("Plastic (?) Dual Inline Pin", it's the package that we think of when we think of ICs...)

But if I may make a suggestion, from your previous posts I think you might need to start with something a bit more basic.  For example, there are a LOT of different types of ICs. There isn't just one thing called an "IC" that you buy and then make a robot with.  They all do different things, and unless you know what you're looking for, sometimes it can be hard to know what to even ask. 

Maybe you should take a bit of time to become more familiar with electronics.  Maybe get an Arduino or an Axon to learn how to connect things and program them, and then you will be in much better shape to move to more complex projects.  Of course, it's just a suggestion, if you want to jump right in then have fun :-)

MIKE
Current project: tactile sensing systems for multifingered robot hands

Offline Soeren

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Re: microcontroller pins
« Reply #2 on: April 19, 2012, 06:30:18 PM »
Hi,

You would likely be using the "PDIP" package ("Plastic (?) Dual Inline Pin", it's the package that we think of when we think of ICs...)
What we think, depends a little on who we are I'd inject ;)
On a global scale, DIP is a marginal product.

Yes, the first P is "Plastic", but the last is "Package"
DIP = Dual Inline Package
SIP = Single Inline Package
SOP Small Outline Package
Etc.

But there really isn't any rules to it and a lot of manu's invent crazy names all the times - Like eg ÁMax (pronounced mu-Max or micro-Max) - now where's the logic in that  ::)
Always check the dimensional drawings (and get a stereo microscope for some of the packages if you're past 30 ;D
Regards,
S°ren

A rather fast and fairly heavy robot with quite large wheels needs what? A lot of power?
Please remember...
Engineering is based on numbers - not adjectives

 


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