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Author Topic: $50 robot eagle PCB review  (Read 745 times)

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Offline ErikYTopic starter

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$50 robot eagle PCB review
« on: June 21, 2012, 03:11:21 PM »
Would someone be so kind as to review my $50 robot eagle PCB board?

I am relatively new to electronics, and this is my first eagle project, so while it looks right to me, I suspect I may have some errors.

Note, this is for the 6pin programmer with both the 4AA and the 9V battery packs, per webbot's PDF picture.

I had been trying for about 2 weeks to properly solder the board, and I am having a brutal time soldering. I have very shaky hands and the tight connections are virtually impossible for me.

I figured I would give Eagle a shot and I really liked it.

If I can get the eagle board right, I next need to learn how to etch and transfer!

Thanks!

Offline Soeren

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Re: $50 robot eagle PCB review
« Reply #1 on: June 23, 2012, 01:56:55 PM »
Hi,

Would someone be so kind as to review my $50 robot eagle PCB board?

Always include both schematic and PCB layout as they may both be needed (but don't include a large number of the back-up files that Eagle makes at every save, as they're not needed here.


I am relatively new to electronics, and this is my first eagle project, so while it looks right to me, I suspect I may have some errors.

Note, this is for the 6pin programmer with both the 4AA and the 9V battery packs, per webbot's PDF picture.

I had been trying for about 2 weeks to properly solder the board, and I am having a brutal time soldering. I have very shaky hands and the tight connections are virtually impossible for me.

I figured I would give Eagle a shot and I really liked it.

If I can get the eagle board right, I next need to learn how to etch and transfer!

For a first time attempt, it ain't half bad, but there's room for improvement of course...

About PCB layout in general:
Always use single sided PCB material if at all possible - it's cheaper and you won't have to solder both sides.
Making tracks as wide as practically possible means less wear on your etching bath, lss sulphates in the environment and more copper to carry the current (hence a lower impedance).
Use a copper pour where possible for the same reasons (not on extemely high impedance circuits and HF circuits though).
Never use sharp (90° or less) corners, as this increases radiation. and weakens the physical "cling" of the copper foil to the carrier material (i.e. it peals much easier).

Your particular layout:
You have the connectors 1.5 module apart. Your voltage regulator is placed so that a heat sink would interfere with the power connector.

You should start your layout at 0,0 as you can then measure width and height by just pointing at the upper right corner.

Where's your other layers, like silk screen etc?


Had you searched the forum, you might have stumbled over this layout I made:
http://That.Homepage.dk/PDF/$50_Robot_SCH_OVL_PCB.pdf
It's single sided, doesn't wear too much on your etchant and is fairly small.
Even if you insist in making your own, at least take a look at it, to see how it should be done :)
Regards,
Søren

A rather fast and fairly heavy robot with quite large wheels needs what? A lot of power?
Please remember...
Engineering is based on numbers - not adjectives

Offline ErikYTopic starter

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Re: $50 robot eagle PCB review
« Reply #2 on: June 24, 2012, 04:30:44 AM »
Hi,

Would someone be so kind as to review my $50 robot eagle PCB board?

Always include both schematic and PCB layout as they may both be needed (but don't include a large number of the back-up files that Eagle makes at every save, as they're not needed here.


I am relatively new to electronics, and this is my first eagle project, so while it looks right to me, I suspect I may have some errors.

Note, this is for the 6pin programmer with both the 4AA and the 9V battery packs, per webbot's PDF picture.

I had been trying for about 2 weeks to properly solder the board, and I am having a brutal time soldering. I have very shaky hands and the tight connections are virtually impossible for me.

I figured I would give Eagle a shot and I really liked it.

If I can get the eagle board right, I next need to learn how to etch and transfer!

For a first time attempt, it ain't half bad, but there's room for improvement of course...

About PCB layout in general:
Always use single sided PCB material if at all possible - it's cheaper and you won't have to solder both sides.
Making tracks as wide as practically possible means less wear on your etching bath, lss sulphates in the environment and more copper to carry the current (hence a lower impedance).
Use a copper pour where possible for the same reasons (not on extemely high impedance circuits and HF circuits though).
Never use sharp (90° or less) corners, as this increases radiation. and weakens the physical "cling" of the copper foil to the carrier material (i.e. it peals much easier).

Your particular layout:
You have the connectors 1.5 module apart. Your voltage regulator is placed so that a heat sink would interfere with the power connector.

You should start your layout at 0,0 as you can then measure width and height by just pointing at the upper right corner.

Where's your other layers, like silk screen etc?


Had you searched the forum, you might have stumbled over this layout I made:
http://That.Homepage.dk/PDF/$50_Robot_SCH_OVL_PCB.pdf
It's single sided, doesn't wear too much on your etchant and is fairly small.
Even if you insist in making your own, at least take a look at it, to see how it should be done :)


Soeren, thanks much for your reply!

I did not do a schematic, I only did a board in eagle. To be honest, I tried to do a schematic but I had a very hard time, whereas the board I was able to copy from looking at the pdf. Seeing yours wil help me and I will now do it myself.

Thanks for this pdf! I was desperately trying to make it single sided but I just could no figure out how without crossing wires because of the programmer.

I actually did search and found a bunch of others but I actually missed yours.

Yes, I do insist on doing my own because I feel I need to learn what I am doing rather than just use someone elses, but seeing yours will allow me to do it myself.

Regarding silk screen, I am actually not sure about that layer or what it does.

My assumption was that I needed to do a top layer, turn off everything except for the pads and the wires, print it, then do a bottom layer again turning off everything except for the pads and wire and print that as well.

I thought the black was what would get transferred to the copper board, and would prevent the pads and wires from being etched off, and I would then have my board.

However, based on your question and looking at your black pads/wires, I am assuming I am on the wrong path here.

« Last Edit: June 24, 2012, 04:44:12 AM by ErikY »

 


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