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Author Topic: Ohms Law and the resistor  (Read 603 times)

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Offline vipulan12Topic starter

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Ohms Law and the resistor
« on: August 03, 2012, 03:45:51 PM »
hey guys,

I am kinda confused on how ohms law relates to a circuit with a resistor.

V=IR

-so if thats true if I were to increase the resistance or current i would ultimately increase the voltage but that doesn't apply to resistors

resistors provide resistance so by adding more resistance we should increase voltage but that's not the case
 the resistor blocks current and voltage

so could someone explain to me why that is?

thanks

Offline waltr

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Re: Ohms Law and the resistor
« Reply #1 on: August 03, 2012, 04:34:21 PM »
Hold one of the three variable in the Ohm's law equation constant. Then change one of the other two variables and the third must change according the the equation.

Typical example is putting a variable resistor (potentiometer) across a constant voltage power supply. In this case the voltage (correctly called E or U in Ohm's Law, E = I*R) is constant and the current, I (measured in Amperes) is dependent on the resistor value. Turn the pot, changing the resistance, and the current changes.
This is calculated by rearranging the equation to I = E/R.

Now to your example: If you put a resistor across a constant current power supply. Then if you change the resistance, turn the pot, then the voltage will change as in E = I * R.

Quote
the resistor blocks current and voltage
False.
resistors 'resist' the flow of current.
When a resistor is put across a constant voltage source, the resistors value does not matter (unless the source can not supply the required current). As in my first example the voltage does not change when the resistance value changes. Only the current through the resistor changes.

Two points to remember:
1- Voltage is the Potential across a resistor.
2- Current is the Flow of electrons through a resistor.

Your next task is to connect different value resistors to a voltage source, measure the voltage and resistance  then calculate the current. Also calculate the Power (P = E * I) and feel the heat dissipated by the resistor (proof that the equations do work).
« Last Edit: August 04, 2012, 09:13:45 PM by waltr »

Offline Soeren

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Re: Ohms Law and the resistor
« Reply #2 on: August 04, 2012, 10:02:40 AM »
Hi Waltr,

Thanks for touting the proper use of symbolic values! :)

I guess the mind slipped on the last one though ;)
Also calculate the Power (P = V * I) [...]
P=U*I (or P=E*I)


vipulan12 <- You are probably tinking in terms of a limited voltage supply. Think of a current supply with an infinite voltage. or think of a 9V battery with a 1 Ohm resistor shunting it - the voltage will be low (and the current high) - change the resistor to something huge - like the air between its terminals and the voltage will be high (but the current will be a few pA, depending on ambient humidity).
Regards,
Søren

A rather fast and fairly heavy robot with quite large wheels needs what? A lot of power?
Please remember...
Engineering is based on numbers - not adjectives

Offline waltr

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Re: Ohms Law and the resistor
« Reply #3 on: August 04, 2012, 09:16:07 PM »

I guess the mind slipped on the last one though ;)
Also calculate the Power (P = V * I) [...]
P=U*I (or P=E*I)


Ahh...thanks for pointing that out. I corrected my post above.

 


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