Mechanics and Construction > Mechanics and Construction

Servo torque

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waltr:

--- Quote from: drinu on January 31, 2013, 03:19:37 PM ---Is there a way to change the motors position (instead of at every joint) so to increase the torque?

--- End quote ---
No, Torque is measured from the center of rotation.
To increase the torque output of a given motor use speed reduction gearing.

Look up Torque in Wiki and other Web sources for definitions and examples.

jkerns:

--- Quote from: drinu on January 31, 2013, 03:19:37 PM ---Is there a way to change the motors position (instead of at every joint) so to increase the torque?

--- End quote ---
Use a lever.

drinu:
Hi, thanks for the replies.

Will the attached sketches help in any way increase the load capacity?? (when compared to the motors being attached to each joint/axis)



jwatte:
You will increase torque if you build a system with mechanical leverage -- one that turns fewer degrees at the load than it does on the motor. For example, if your load-holding piece turns 45 degrees when your motor turns 90 degrees, you will get a 2:1 increase in torque around the pivot point of the load-holding piece.

jkerns:

--- Quote from: drinu on February 01, 2013, 06:31:18 PM ---Hi, thanks for the replies.

Will the attached sketches help in any way increase the load capacity?? (when compared to the motors being attached to each joint/axis)





--- End quote ---


So you are using motors to turn a screw to make a linear actuator? Likely you would get more force than a direct drive motor - but of couse, you are trading off speed. You really need to do the math to translate the motor torque into the linear force via the pitch of the threads to translate from rotary to linear motion. I would assume that the efficiency of your screw drive is only about 50% - there tend to be a lot of friction losses.

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