Electronics > Electronics

will this motor work

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sohailsameja:
is there a way of modding it so it can be geared,but according to you which is the best choice(regardless of anything)

P.S You are very helpful thanks.

sohailsameja:
by the way can increasing the weight of the tires or bodies increase torque.

BTW: is this true:

velocity=2*pi*r*rpm
torque=d*f
f=m*a
a=change in velocity/time

so if i calculate a using anything even a ticker timer
and i have the mass of robot and rpm of motor.Can i be able to calculate the torque?

drinu:
Hi,

It depends on the size of the robot. Do you have a photo?

Are you going to use gears with the motor's output shaft to increasing torque?

On ebay you will find many inexpensive motors with gears :

http://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/i.html?_nkw=gear+motor+kg&_sacat=0&_odkw=gear+motor&_osacat=0&_from=R40

and BTW I would guess the top motor is the best. The ones at the bottom, as far as I know have very low torque.

newInRobotics:

--- Quote from: sohailsameja on March 06, 2013, 10:30:10 AM ---is there a way of modding it so it can be geared,but according to you which is the best choice(regardless of anything)
--- End quote ---
Gearing is the only way to reduce angular velocity (RPM) and increase torque of the motor. You can buy required ratio gearbox separately and plug to Your motor.


--- Quote from: sohailsameja on March 06, 2013, 10:33:26 AM ---by the way can increasing the weight of the tires or bodies increase torque.
--- End quote ---
Increasing weight of the robot will increase torque required to move it.


--- Quote from: sohailsameja on March 06, 2013, 10:33:26 AM ---BTW: is this true:

velocity=2*pi*r*rpm
torque=d*f
f=m*a
a=change in velocity/time
--- End quote ---
Velocity formula is correct.
Torque formula is not, it should be T = F * r (Torque = Force * radius).
Force formula is correct.


--- Quote from: sohailsameja on March 06, 2013, 10:33:26 AM ---[...] i have the mass of robot and rpm of motor.Can i be able to calculate the torque?
--- End quote ---
To calculate required torque You have to know desired acceleration, mass of the robot and wheel radius.


--- Quote from: sohailsameja on March 06, 2013, 10:33:26 AM ---so if i calculate a using anything even a ticker timer
--- End quote ---
To get acceleration simply think this way - decide on the max speed You want your robot to go, and then think of how long You wouldn't mind to wait for robot to reach that speed.


Example:

I want my robot to go at 5km/h (1.39m/s) max and I'm prepared to wait no more than 2.5s for it to reach that speed;
a = 1.39m/s / 2.5s = 0.556m/s2;

Now, my robot's mass is 1.6kg, so force required to achieve required acceleration is F = 1.6kg * 0.556m/s2 = 0.8896N (Newton);

Say my robot has wheels of 2.5cm radius (0.025m), this tells us that motor should output at least T = 0.025m * 0.8896N = 0.02224N*m (Newton meters) of torque, but we don't want motor to run at 100%, so lets do this NewTorque = 0.02224N*m / 0.75 = 0.03N*m;

jwatte:
The easiest way to increase torque is to use a rubber band across the output shaft of the motor (small diameter) and then across a large wheel/cup/plate/disc on your actual wheel shaft. Maybe even directly around the wheels. Getting the rubber band to stay on and not jump off is tricky; you may need to build some rims with glue or epoxy or plastic or something.

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