Author Topic: places for materials  (Read 705 times)

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Offline vipulan12Topic starter

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places for materials
« on: July 15, 2013, 09:00:58 PM »
where are some good places to obtain building materials in Brampton,Ontario?
materials like aluminum,plastics and a variety of other stuff

Offline ROBOT420

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Re: places for materials
« Reply #1 on: July 15, 2013, 10:39:30 PM »
Can you make due with hardened Beaver pelts? ;D
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Offline jwatte

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Re: places for materials
« Reply #2 on: July 16, 2013, 09:48:37 AM »
Amazon.com, through their purchase of smallparts.com, sells aluminum and plastic and steel materials (flat bar, cut plate, round stock, etc.)

Offline itsjustgame578

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Re: places for materials
« Reply #3 on: July 16, 2013, 12:06:49 PM »
McMaster - cheap, and TONS of everything... where i get my plastic, aluminum, and all my hardware (bolts, nuts, blah blah blah) quick shipping too
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Offline vipulan12Topic starter

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Re: places for materials
« Reply #4 on: July 16, 2013, 06:59:02 PM »
thanks mcmaster seems good

what does it mean by metal certification?
why are there options for choosing polished metals like aluminum?
also what does it mean by mill(finish)?

also to ROBOT420 funny canadian stereotype
« Last Edit: July 16, 2013, 07:12:08 PM by vipulan12 »

Offline jwatte

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Re: places for materials
« Reply #5 on: July 16, 2013, 10:16:44 PM »
Material certification is needed when you're building things for customers who require positive knowledge that the materials will hold for what they're designed for. As far as I understand it, if the material were to be sub-spec, people could die, hence getting the certification comes with a certain amount of liability, and thus costs a lot. Also, the certification likely allows you to track everything about the material, back to when it was a simple rock in the ground, which is sometimes useful for analysis purposes.

"Mill" finish is the finish that comes out of the big stamping/rolling/pressing machines they use at the mill to manufacture the material. It is overall pretty flat, but it is matte in color because it has long "lines" running lengthwise, or if you cut it cross-wise, you will see a small waviness across the top. The depth is usually negligible, but if you want that "shiny metal" look you will have to mill or polish it with high-finish tools. If you don't want it polished, but instead want to paint/powdercoat it, you will want to sandblast it. Or just use it the way it is if surface finish isn't a top priority. (This is what I do)

There's also something called "mill scale" which steel materials may have, which comes from the heat involved in the forging or tempering process. You don't want this on your steel, as it will get in the way of welding and working it; it has to be removed (sandblasted or acid pickled.) If you get cold rolled steel, it's usually not a problem, and it's not a problem on aluminum or plastic.

 


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