Author Topic: Do I need a driver to turn on this DC motor??  (Read 1745 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline thibraaniTopic starter

  • Beginner
  • *
  • Posts: 6
  • Helpful? 0
Do I need a driver to turn on this DC motor??
« on: October 16, 2007, 12:59:53 AM »
Hallo to all.
I'm doing an assignment using PIC16F877A and a DC motor (from Tamiya). The microcontroller should be able to turn the motor ON and OFF. The motor is connected to PORTB (spesifically PB0). The motor is operated using 5V DC.

I have finished assembling the circuit and the program required to drive the motor. When I turn on the PIC circuit (and toggle the switch ON), PB0 produces logic HIGH which is equivalent to 5V DC. However, the motor is failed to move or Turn ON.

Please be informed that I connect the motor DIRECTLY to PB0 and to the ground. I use a switch as an input to control the motor, which is connected to PORTD.

Can anyone out there give comment on my hardware? Do I need a driver for the motor? If the driver is needed, what type of IC should be installed to the circuit?


Offline Steve Joblin

  • Supreme Robot
  • *****
  • Posts: 405
  • Helpful? 2
Re: Do I need a driver to turn on this DC motor??
« Reply #1 on: October 16, 2007, 08:56:50 AM »
When dealing with motors, it is amps, not volts that matters.  Your microcontroller can not source the amps your motor needs.  You can buy a motor controller or make your own H-Bridge circuit using transistors and diodes.

You can use a L293D motor controller chip to control the direction of two motors.  Alternaively, a BCX38B Darlington Transistor and a 1N4001 Diode (and probably a 10K resistor) would also work for controlling a single motor.
« Last Edit: October 16, 2007, 09:49:04 AM by Steve Joblin »

Offline Admin

  • Administrator
  • Supreme Robot
  • *****
  • Posts: 11,663
  • Helpful? 169
    • Society of Robots
Re: Do I need a driver to turn on this DC motor??
« Reply #2 on: October 16, 2007, 10:13:38 AM »
Quote
When dealing with motors, it is amps, not volts that matters.
Its actually power (which is voltage * current) that matters ;D
But otherwise Steve is right, you have the voltage, but no current!

 


Get Your Ad Here

data_list