Author Topic: Best recommended board besides Cerebellum  (Read 2090 times)

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Offline cubandanger05Topic starter

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Best recommended board besides Cerebellum
« on: December 28, 2007, 04:38:03 PM »
this is my first post, its kind of long, but please read it and help me out as much as posible  :-\

hey everyone, first of all, i know 0 about robotics and programming (well, i know a bit now that ive visited the website and read some tutorials for about a week).

I would like to build my first robot. Ive been browsing online looking for the no longer sold Cerebellum board which appears to be very popular between robot-makers. I know, i know, why go for such advanced board instead of just making my own beginner one following the $50 robot tutorial? well, im kind of lazy  :-\ and as i could see it takes a bit to actually put one together so i think its best for me to just put my hands on one that is already ready to go like the Cerebellum since its almost a plug and play thing (not really, but you may know what i mean). I also know that this specific board is not being sold anymore, so here is my question: Which board do you guys recommend or which board is the best to use, after the Cerebellum, and that actually has the same features and components of the Cerebellum including:

-On-board dual motor driver circuit to drive two DC motors (up to 2 Amps each).
-8 High-Resolution Analog ports.
-Up to 10 Digital I/O ports.
-Up to 8 Ports that support Servo hardware.
-Two user buttons and Two programmable LEDs for debugging.
-Programming with standard serial port and cable.
-I2C port allowing daisy chaining of Cerebellums and connection to sophisticated sensors.
-and perhaps even more stuff than the Cerebellum

Based on what i want my robot to do you guys can also recommend a board. I want my robot to be fast, to be able to use at least 2 servos, diferent types of sensors (IR, sound, light)(2 or more of each) so it can detect objects, avoid them or chase them depending on how i program it, wether to know when to turn and where to turn when close to an object, to be kind of invicible to other robot's sensors, etc. It sounds like a very ambicious (dont know if spelled correctly) project for someone that has never made a robot before and knows very little about robotics, programming and electronics BUT i consider myself smart enough to take the challenge and besides if i want a good robot i require good parts that i can later on reuse on other projects. Maybe a list of stuff i need would be also good like a specific type of servo, a specific sharp IR detector or whatever you call it. Now, i dont want the most expensive stuff (even though money is not a problem), but i would like to keep it somewhere between the cheapest-worst stuff and the highest costing-best quality stuff, somewhere in the middle of them two.

This is my first post, please reply me with helpful information as if you were the ones creating "the perfect robot", remember i dont need expensive stuff but good quality stuff. thank you in advance

Offline robonoob

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Re: Best recommended board besides Cerebellum
« Reply #1 on: December 29, 2007, 07:01:41 AM »
well there is a thing(a development board actually :P) that I'm eager to use, it doesn't have all the requirements that u were asking...like the dual h-bridge or what ever u wanted :D and i doesn't have the pins to attach the servo directly but i sure is a great place to start learning about robots... it has plenty of analog and digital pins... where u can connect the servos(but not directly as i said... cuz the analog pins are in one row and power and grd are on the other row so u have to use wires) and many sensors... it uses a USB cable to communicate with a computer(the cable only costs about $4) anyway... the board itself is called arduino... go to youtube or google or anywhere and look for arduino u can find very many tutorials of how to programme it and how to use it... it has free software witch is really easy to programme...
anyway here are some links you should see :http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yqVCat_rucQ (this is a simple robot controlled by the arduino
http://www.adafruit.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=17&products_id=68&zenid=6ae1feb5d72c5845a0c1205cad00b7f5(this is a starter pack witch has the USB cable and all the necessary stuff u will need...even the protoshield kit(not assembled u need to solder all the part urself...) and a small breadboard with it also...
http://www.ladyada.net/learn/arduino/ this is THE-BEST-ARDUINO-TUTORIAL-PAGE-EVER i have found :P if u are a starter in electronics like myself then i would read this tutorial from beginning to the end.. :P it gives u the basics of programming and writing the code with the arduino...
http://www.arduino.cc/ this is the official page of the arduino board... you can download the software and the drivers there and you can also read about the code commands and all...
anyway i would highly recommend u to use this :P :D(like top shop huh? :D)

okei i hope it helped... it doesn't have all the things u wanted it to have but hey why do u need to use the DC motors if u could use servos ;)

Offline cubandanger05Topic starter

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Re: Best recommended board besides Cerebellum
« Reply #2 on: December 29, 2007, 09:20:52 AM »
thanks for your reply. Ive been reading about the arduino and so far you cant conect servos directly to it unless you use something else like the breadboard. to be more specific i want to build a robot very similar to the Hyper Squirrel  so the board that im going to use:

-has to allow me to conect at least 3 servos directly to it,
-has to have a microcontroler (ofcourse),
-has to allow me to conect a sharpIR rangefinder to it WITHOUT major modifications, and perhaps a few other sensors
-a minimun of 2 leds
-a way to connect to my computer for programming purposes [rs232 or USB (USB prefered)]
-bootloading (which most of the new boards already come with it)
-a way to connect power sources to it (rechargeable battery, AA batteries, or both)
-and any other goodies that i might need

im going to do some browsing and see if i can find such board (if there is any with all that) and ill be posting links for you guys to check out and recommend me, sometimes you cant look for something if you dont even know what it looks like or what it does

Offline robonoob

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Re: Best recommended board besides Cerebellum
« Reply #3 on: December 29, 2007, 09:47:57 AM »
is it necessary for u to connect theese things directly or are u just lazy? :D

Offline cubandanger05Topic starter

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Re: Best recommended board besides Cerebellum
« Reply #4 on: December 29, 2007, 11:29:15 AM »
i did mentioned that i kind of lazy  :D , besides it is WAY better and easier to connect those things directly to the motherboard without having to use any aditional adapter.

if there is such board that meets all my needs please recommend it, thank you  ;)

Offline cubandanger05Topic starter

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Re: Best recommended board besides Cerebellum
« Reply #5 on: December 29, 2007, 12:52:36 PM »
is it necessary for u to connect theese things directly or are u just lazy? :D



will this board help improve my lazyness?  ;D

http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.bdmicro.com/mavric-iib/mav2b_phtv_ann1b_vsm.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.bdmicro.com/mavric-iib/&h=384&w=512&sz=60&hl=en&start=18&tbnid=k22_ifAZb1uypM:&tbnh=98&tbnw=131&prev=/images%3Fq%3DATmega128%26gbv%3D2%26svnum%3D10%26hl%3Den%26safe%3Doff


does it cover all my needs? i ask because what in robotic language a "6 R/C servo headers for controlling servos directly" to me is "pins where i can conect the servos to". So i need to know from an experienced and veteran on robot-making person if this board will do everything that i want it to do such as

-has to allow me to conect at least 3 servos directly to it,
-has to have a microcontroler (ofcourse),
-has to allow me to conect a sharpIR rangefinder to it WITHOUT major modifications, and perhaps a few other sensors
-a minimun of 2 leds
-a way to connect to my computer for programming purposes [rs232 or USB (USB prefered)]
-bootloading (which most of the new boards already come with it)
-a way to connect power sources to it (rechargeable battery, AA batteries, or both)
-and any other goodies that i might need?

Offline robonoob

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Re: Best recommended board besides Cerebellum
« Reply #6 on: December 29, 2007, 01:23:06 PM »
as far as i know the servos have 3 connections but why do theese servo pins have 4?

Offline cubandanger05Topic starter

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Re: Best recommended board besides Cerebellum
« Reply #7 on: December 29, 2007, 01:40:45 PM »
as far as i know the servos have 3 connections but why do theese servo pins have 4?


maybe because they are "rc servos", i dont know, why you asking me jejeje? i should be asking you. but can i just connect the 3 connections servos to the I/O headers? or to the A/D converter inputs?

Offline Darkbluestar

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Re: Best recommended board besides Cerebellum
« Reply #8 on: December 30, 2007, 05:36:52 PM »
If you look at the manual it tells you that the bottom 3 pins are for the servo and that the top pin is for selecting which I/O pin the servo gets connected to. So sounds like you must jumper the top pin to one of the I/O pins to control a servo.

Quote
Each of the 6 servo connectors is composed of 4 pins as shown. The bottom three pins are labeled Signal,
VServo, and GND and is where the servo connector is connected. The 4th pin located above the servo connector and
labeled Signal on the MAVRIC-IIB silkscreen and Servo Pin Selector in the diagram above is used to select which
ATmega128 pin is used to drive that servo. This layout was chosen because most of the ATmega128's available I/O
pins are shared with at least one of the chip's special peripheral features. This layout allows you to choose which
of the ATmega128 pin(s) are used for driving servos, as opposed to hard-wiring the servo signal to certain pins,
which would otherwise make the special peripheral feature of that pin unavailable to your application.

 


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