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Author Topic: Wheel Chair motor controller  (Read 2402 times)

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Offline AsellithTopic starter

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Wheel Chair motor controller
« on: March 12, 2008, 08:46:50 PM »
I have a motor controller from a Quickie P110 and I can't seem to find any information on the system. It was made by Penny + Giles Drive Technologies and I have the model number (D49306/2) but the Penny + Giles site is useless and does not contain information going back that far. I emailed them for info and googled the crap outa everything I can think of. I also have the motors they are nice 24 VDC 11.5 A motors that I want to use. I am building an experimential platform from this guy so I want to get the mobility part of it rock solid and then experiment with sensors and navigation. However the guy I bought the chair from said it worked but one motor moved slower. Not sure if it is the motor or the controller. I want to run some tests and work on the structural condition (lots of rust in the battery compartment) till I have the cash to buy big batteries to run it. However I can't find any information on it at all. Anyone have experience with these kinds of systems?

Thanks
Jonathan Bowen
Jonathan Bowen
CorSec Engineering
www.corseceng.com

Offline Soeren

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Re: Wheel Chair motor controller
« Reply #1 on: March 13, 2008, 07:29:11 AM »
Hi,

Having two of each makes it really simple to find out. Swap the motors to see if it's the controller or the motor itself.
Regards,
Søren

A rather fast and fairly heavy robot with quite large wheels needs what? A lot of power?
Please remember...
Engineering is based on numbers - not adjectives

Offline AsellithTopic starter

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Re: Wheel Chair motor controller
« Reply #2 on: March 13, 2008, 10:35:55 AM »
That was my plan but I want to be able to interface with the unit with different equipment so now that I have time and no money I really just want to get more info on the unit. I need things like the pinouts for the connectors and I need to figure out why the motor connectors have 4 wires. There are two massive like 12 gauge cables that are for power but two 22 gauge (control lines?) wires that are both read and head down into the motor as well. I can't find any information on the motors or the controller right now.
Jonathan Bowen
CorSec Engineering
www.corseceng.com

Offline Admin

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Re: Wheel Chair motor controller
« Reply #3 on: March 15, 2008, 07:04:48 PM »
To get an idea, google around for motors that look/seem similar and look at those datasheets.

The only other way is to just run a bunch of tests on it, measuring current and torque, etc.

Offline AsellithTopic starter

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Re: Wheel Chair motor controller
« Reply #4 on: March 15, 2008, 10:26:09 PM »
I tried hooking up my power supply to the controller and running them but it only does 12 volts. So I was connecting the positive and negative outputs to the battery terminals but it was used and cost me $10 so it needs some work first :) The voltage pots need cleaned they are not working right. I think I'm just going to buy some batteries and run my tests with those.
Jonathan Bowen
CorSec Engineering
www.corseceng.com

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Re: Wheel Chair motor controller
« Reply #5 on: March 21, 2008, 08:50:13 PM »
Quote
I am building an experimential platform from this guy so I want to get the mobility part of it rock solid
Well, I don't know your torque requirements . . . but if its going to be a mobile robot, I'd go with a lower voltage motor because those heavy batteries will really cause your bot some problems. Of course you'd have to buy more stuff this way, but it still might not cost you much more than 24V batteries that can supply 11A of current continuous.

Offline ALZ

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Re: Wheel Chair motor controller
« Reply #6 on: March 22, 2008, 12:42:06 AM »
Hi: In most wheel chair motors, two wires go to the motor and two wires go to the brake. You must put power to the brake at all times to get the motor to run. Most people take the cover off at the back of motor and take the brake out so that you don't waste power. I would save it in case you ever want to use the motor again; for ex. in a robotic arm. It could be use to hold the arm in one place without the need for power.

That was my plan but I want to be able to interface with the unit with different equipment so now that I have time and no money I really just want to get more info on the unit. I need things like the pinouts for the connectors and I need to figure out why the motor connectors have 4 wires. There are two massive like 12 gauge cables that are for power but two 22 gauge (control lines?) wires that are both read and head down into the motor as well. I can't find any information on the motors or the controller right now.

Offline bulkhead

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Re: Wheel Chair motor controller
« Reply #7 on: March 22, 2008, 12:50:25 AM »
The two small wires are brake wires.  The easier solution is to physically remove these brakes which clamp onto the motor shaft unless power is applied to the small wires. 

For motor controllers try the Victor 883's.  Run fuses to protect them (or whichever controller you use).

If the platform doesn't need to be that big (carry wheelchair size loads) wheelchair motors are probably overkill.

 


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