Author Topic: Robot Math  (Read 4242 times)

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Offline pomprockerTopic starter

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Robot Math
« on: April 16, 2008, 06:16:35 PM »
I see there is a lot of math involved in robotics.

I've taken college algebra, trig, calculus 1, calculus 2, probability and statistics, and about to take linear algebra.

I still know nothing about nothing =P


Where can I learn about math as it applies to robotics?

I am really dumb at math. I just don't get how to apply it.

Offline Trumpkin

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Re: Robot Math
« Reply #1 on: April 16, 2008, 07:26:50 PM »
kk ummm here are some simple formulas.

V=I*R
I=V divided by R
R=V divided by I

This is called the v i r triangle or Ohms law. I=current V=voltage R=resistance

p=V*I
I can't really remember if this is right but this is how you find out how much power is disapated. Hope this helps get you started!
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Offline AndrewM

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Re: Robot Math
« Reply #2 on: April 16, 2008, 07:55:25 PM »
It's all in what aspects you want to learn when it comes to applied math.  As I am sure you are well aware by now, robotics consists of a variety of different fields:  mechanics, electronics, programming, construction, etc.  Each field has its own mathematical formulas.  Pick one and start there.  If you try and learn it all at once (beyond a basic level that is) you will get to being overwhelmed very quickly. 

As you learn each field, and how to apply not only mathematics, but other principles, you will find that each new field is easier to learn.
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Offline pomprockerTopic starter

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Re: Robot Math
« Reply #3 on: April 16, 2008, 08:01:59 PM »
Yes I have became overwhelmed by seeing the math in each of those fields. I am a computer science major right now so maybe ill stick to the math as it applies to programming. like advanced sensor interpretation.

Offline JesseWelling

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Re: Robot Math
« Reply #4 on: April 17, 2008, 12:49:32 AM »
Matrix theory is a must for all CS majors, and most advanced robotics.

Offline pomprockerTopic starter

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Re: Robot Math
« Reply #5 on: April 17, 2008, 01:03:59 AM »
Maybe someone could write up some lessons for these things on this site so that I don't have to leave the site to re-learn all this stuff.

Offline Ro-Bot-X

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Re: Robot Math
« Reply #6 on: April 17, 2008, 08:29:04 AM »
Pomprocker is right.

I think it would be a cool idea to have all the tutorials needed for a person that doesn't know anything at all about robotics to learn all that he needs to take robotics from beginner to medium-advanced.

So far we have some of the things needed. Some electronics, some mechanics, some programming. All of them imply extensive documentation from the net instead of having it directly available. I know there are good tutorials that don't need to be redone, but they could be hosted (with author's permission) or referenced. Unfortunately Admin doesn't have time to do it alone. That is why there should be an official "Assistent" that could do all of this. More work can be done this way.

SoR can become an online Robot Builder's Bonanza. A place where (almost) anyone can find the answer for his robotic related questions.
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Offline pomprockerTopic starter

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Re: Robot Math
« Reply #7 on: April 17, 2008, 10:18:38 AM »
I know there a handful of  math geniuses posting in here, They could create a member page and do lessons organized into sections where it applies. Programming, Electronics, and Mechanical. I know sometimes Admin says "simple highschool trig", but I didn't take it until college and I didn't find it very simple at all!


Maybe Admin could host a wiki on here. I know Mediawiki is a good one.
« Last Edit: April 17, 2008, 10:19:30 AM by pomprocker »

Offline Lefteris

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Re: Robot Math
« Reply #8 on: April 17, 2008, 11:42:05 AM »
I would guess it depends on the part of robotics you would like to focus. I would say statistics, probability theory and very good matrix and linear algebra. Also get a good book on AI in general or on something you would like to focus in particular.

For example I took Neural networks combined with signal processing las year. Liked it so I asked my professor for extra books to study and maybe do a master course on them later. That has A LOT of math but as with everything a good book and/or teacher makes a major difference.

Offline Webbot

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Re: Robot Math
« Reply #9 on: April 17, 2008, 11:59:38 AM »
Vectors would also be useful (either in 2D or 3D). Addition, subtraction, unit vectors. But especially cross and dot products as this means you can often replace the usual sin/cos/tan functions with some simple multiplications and additions.
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Offline AndrewM

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Re: Robot Math
« Reply #10 on: April 17, 2008, 04:59:54 PM »
Just reading the past four or five replies on this post would have my head spinning if I were a newby robot builder.  Matrix and linear algebra, vector mathematics?  I think the basics would be a far better place to start for tutorials.  As admin puts it, some "simple trig" is a huge thing, especially on the programming and construction side of things.  Electronics formulas 101, which are even more basic in nature, and the how and why to use them.  Etc.

Only because I brought it up in a previous thread, I will second the wiki idea  ;D  Whenever I am thinking about writing tutorials I often get the feeling that whatever I have in mind would be over kill for a tutorial.  Like OHMs law and parallel paths.  Two paragraphs, maybe three.  Looking at the existing tutorials it seems like it would not really fit in.  But as a wiki...  Probably just me eccentricity though.
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Offline hazzer123

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Re: Robot Math
« Reply #11 on: April 19, 2008, 08:40:38 AM »
Tutorials on matrices and vectors ect are pasted all over the internet.
Sure links to the best tutorials on these topics would be good, but I think it would be much more useful to concentrate on the things that arent all over the net.
Like robot building tutorials for the hobby enthusiast.
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Offline pomprockerTopic starter

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Re: Robot Math
« Reply #12 on: April 19, 2008, 10:07:20 AM »
hmm maybe on Admin's tutorials he can provide an outside link whenever he mentions a formula that will teach us how
 ::)



Offline Admin

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Re: Robot Math
« Reply #13 on: April 20, 2008, 07:36:00 AM »
Well, the bare minimum you need to make a robot is understanding of addition and subtraction. Each more advanced math you understand allows you to make more advanced robots. Here is a quick guide:

addition/subtration <- bare minimum, motor control, sensors, encoders
multiplication/division <- fuzzy logic, proportional control
trig <- position/angle control
matrices <- robot mapping, data storage
calculus <- PID control

If someone is good and math and wants to write a tutorial, go for it. Otherwise, just google/wikipedia it for tutorials.

 


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