go_away

Author Topic: Soldering smoke questios.  (Read 11223 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline izaktjTopic starter

  • Robot Overlord
  • ****
  • Posts: 216
  • Helpful? 0
Soldering smoke questios.
« on: September 18, 2008, 11:39:38 PM »
The "smoke" that forms when soldering.
is it toxic?
Damage to the eyes?
« Last Edit: September 18, 2008, 11:40:21 PM by izaktj »

Offline izua

  • Supreme Robot
  • *****
  • Posts: 682
  • Helpful? 0
Re: Soldering smoke questios.
« Reply #1 on: September 19, 2008, 05:36:55 AM »
yep. both solder fumes and rosin fumes are good for lungs ;D
Check out my homepage for in depth tutorials on microcontrollers and electronics.

Offline ArcMan

  • Supreme Robot
  • *****
  • Posts: 519
  • Helpful? 4
  • Mmmm... Plasma
Re: Soldering smoke questios.
« Reply #2 on: September 19, 2008, 08:00:19 AM »
Don't worry too much.  Those fumes are not lead fumes.  They're flux fumes.  You have to get lead REALLY hot before it will fume.

The known danger in lead soldering is eating or smoking cigarettes after soldering without washing your hands.  The lead will get on your skin, which is OK, but you don't want to ingest it.


Offline Admin

  • Administrator
  • Supreme Robot
  • *****
  • Posts: 11,657
  • Helpful? 169
    • Society of Robots
Re: Soldering smoke questios.
« Reply #3 on: September 19, 2008, 08:12:42 AM »
Open up a window and use a small fan to blow it away.

I use a fume sucker.

Offline izaktjTopic starter

  • Robot Overlord
  • ****
  • Posts: 216
  • Helpful? 0
Re: Soldering smoke questios.
« Reply #4 on: September 19, 2008, 12:48:59 PM »
yep. both solder fumes and rosin fumes are good for lungs ;D
Don't worry too much.  Those fumes are not lead fumes.  They're flux fumes.  You have to get lead REALLY hot before it will fume.

The known danger in lead soldering is eating or smoking cigarettes after soldering without washing your hands.  The lead will get on your skin, which is OK, but you don't want to ingest it.

Open up a window and use a small fan to blow it away.

I use a fume sucker.

Thanks a lot guys ;)

Offline benji

  • Supreme Robot
  • *****
  • Posts: 832
  • Helpful? 0
Re: Soldering smoke questios.
« Reply #5 on: September 23, 2008, 04:25:02 PM »
maaan i smoked a lott of these,, buttt,,,,,,doesnt it get back to solder iron at 37 degrees in the lungs ?  :o
good ol' BeNNy

Offline TrickyNekro

  • Contest Winner
  • Supreme Robot
  • ****
  • Posts: 1,207
  • Helpful? 15
  • 1.6L Peugeot 307 tuner
Re: Soldering smoke questios.
« Reply #6 on: September 25, 2008, 07:11:26 AM »
After a little soldering, I sing:

" I want to get highhhhh...... So highhhhh...."

My mother is worried too!!!!

 ;D ;D ;D
For whom the interrupts toll...


P.S. I've been inactive for almost a year... Don't give promises but I'll try to complete my tutorials. I'll let you know when..

Cheers!

Offline Admin

  • Administrator
  • Supreme Robot
  • *****
  • Posts: 11,657
  • Helpful? 169
    • Society of Robots
Re: Soldering smoke questios.
« Reply #7 on: September 25, 2008, 03:44:19 PM »
don't smoke solder joints.

Offline Smoothmachines

  • Beginner
  • *
  • Posts: 4
  • Helpful? 0
Re: Soldering smoke questios.
« Reply #8 on: October 01, 2008, 03:44:56 AM »
Soldering a lot without a fume extractor for a project gave me a heavy headache and my nose, as well as adjacent face parts, turned red so i had that funny "Bozo the clown-look" we all want...
A little processor-fan and an open window did a lot of good, but now i run a fume extractor with filter, vacuum tube mounted directly on the ERSA soldering pen.

Offline Admin

  • Administrator
  • Supreme Robot
  • *****
  • Posts: 11,657
  • Helpful? 169
    • Society of Robots
Re: Soldering smoke questios.
« Reply #9 on: October 05, 2008, 12:40:34 AM »
Just ran into this today . . . how to make a cheap custom fume hood for all your soldering and dangerous chemical needs ;D

http://hackaday.com/2008/08/05/how-to-the-hackers-soldering-station/


Offline izaktjTopic starter

  • Robot Overlord
  • ****
  • Posts: 216
  • Helpful? 0
Re: Soldering smoke questios.
« Reply #10 on: October 07, 2008, 02:35:39 PM »
Just ran into this today . . . how to make a cheap custom fume hood for all your soldering and dangerous chemical needs ;D

http://hackaday.com/2008/08/05/how-to-the-hackers-soldering-station/



Thanks admin!
I also saw somewhere a way to make a fan with a USB and a CD (from thrash of course) so just change the pitch of the blades and voala! You get a fume extrractor  ;D

Offline CuriousInventor.com

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 12
  • Helpful? 0
Re: Soldering smoke questios.
« Reply #11 on: October 10, 2008, 04:06:48 PM »
As already mentioned, the fumes are from the flux, not the lead (boils > 3000 degreesF), although there is some risk of lead particles in the fumes at high enough temperatures.  Also, lead-free fumes have been sited as being worse for you.

Here's more than you ever wanted to know, from our how to solder guide.

 What is exactly in solder fumes? Am I safer using lead-free solder? (no)

Flux fumes from iron tip under 30x magnification :




Lead boils at over 3000 F, and in most cases soldering tips should be kept below 750 F, so it is highly unlikely that gaseous lead is present in the fumes. The fumes are actually from the flux boiling, which still isn't great for you--many of the chemicals found in cigarette smoke are found in flux fumes: formaldehyde, toluene, alcohols, and hydrochloric acid to name a few. Most of the public health literature indicates that asthma is the major health risk from soldering fumes (not cancer or lead poisoning). When acquired, it is permanent and can cause hyper sensitivity so that even small amounts of fumes bring on attacks. Surprisingly, scientists have not been able to determine what exactly in the fumes cause the health defects, nor what amounts are harmful. Yet, the British health department has set exposure limits of .05 mg/m^3 over 8 hours and .15 mg/m^3 over 15 minutes. I believe these limits have been shown to provide a safe work environment and also one for which the necessary systems / filters are financially reasonable.

Some informative links:

    * Solder Fumes and You A British health department pamphlet explaining the health hazards of rosin-based flux fumes (irritation, headaches, dermatitis, asthma) and what precautions employees and employers should take. Note the total lack of any mentioning of lead poisoning.
    * Workplace Exposure to Rosin-based Solder Flux Fume During Hand Soldering A study done by the UK Health and Safety Laboratory measuring exposure levels and also the effectiveness of various exhaust, ventilation, and filter systems.
    * Measurement of the Performance of Air Cleaners Against the Particulate Element of Rosin-based Solder Flux Fume Another UK Health study investigating the effectiveness of various fume extraction and filter systems. Most interesting finding: although activated carbon filters can remove gaseous hazards, they are largely ineffective for fine particulate in the fumes which they believe to cause much of the harm. Some combination of carbon and HEPA filter is needed, and even these are useless without sufficient air flow.

Returning to the topic of lead, it is widely agreed that eating, smoking and drinking without first washing is the greatest risk factor (also mentioned already). Despite the high boiling point of lead, there is also agreement that at least a small amount of lead particles are indeed present in the fumes. The conspicuous lack of emphasis on lead poisoning in all the research done by the UK health department implies that these particles are of little concern.

The material safety data sheet for Kester #44 cored solder says under the fire fighting section: "Melted solder above 1000 F will liberate toxic lead and/or antimony fumes."

According to IPC's DVD-11, "General Safety in Electronic Assembly," when solder is heated past 850 F the lead can become atomized and end up in the fumes. video link (search for DVD-11 at www.ipc.org).


It would seem that, for typical lead-based, rosin cored solder, the risks are probably not that great from the fumes if you only solder occasionally, don't use abnormally high temperatures, and are in a well ventilated area. If ventilation isn't too good, and you're soldering for long periods of time, the cheaper foam-type carbon filters may not be good enough.

But what about lead-free solder? Lead-free solder often requires higher temperatures and more active fluxes, and both of these factors lead to significantly worse fumes.

Fume Extraction Becomes More Important in a Leadfree Environment - from the Weller blog

Another excellent article on the increased risk of lead-free fumes from OK International.

Offline izaktjTopic starter

  • Robot Overlord
  • ****
  • Posts: 216
  • Helpful? 0
Re: Soldering smoke questios.
« Reply #12 on: October 12, 2008, 08:39:44 PM »
Nice guide, what about damage to the eyes?
When I soldered for the first time I used goggles and dust face mask lol
But at school no one used any kind of protection, no fume extractor, nothing.

Offline Admin

  • Administrator
  • Supreme Robot
  • *****
  • Posts: 11,657
  • Helpful? 169
    • Society of Robots
Re: Soldering smoke questios.
« Reply #13 on: October 14, 2008, 03:01:38 AM »
I *always* where goggles when soldering - not to protect myself from fumes, but from flux boiling and splattering in my face. Also when clipping dangling leads.

Offline izaktjTopic starter

  • Robot Overlord
  • ****
  • Posts: 216
  • Helpful? 0
Re: Soldering smoke questios.
« Reply #14 on: October 14, 2008, 10:53:37 PM »
I *always* where goggles when soldering - not to protect myself from fumes, but from flux boiling and splattering in my face. Also when clipping dangling leads.
I'll try to do it lol.

Offline CuriousInventor.com

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 12
  • Helpful? 0
Re: Soldering smoke questios.
« Reply #15 on: October 16, 2008, 05:00:00 AM »
I believe the main threat is to your lungs, but the smoke can definitely irritate your eyes, too.  Lead free fluxes can be worse, depending on the type and manufacturer.  When lead-free solder first came out, the flux fumes were extremely noxious, but manufacturers have since improved the smell, although it's still not great for you.  (this is based on stories from industry people, nothing scientific).

When soldering, you're usually trimming leads, too, and this is probably the main threat to eye balls.

Offline izaktjTopic starter

  • Robot Overlord
  • ****
  • Posts: 216
  • Helpful? 0
Re: Soldering smoke questios.
« Reply #16 on: October 21, 2008, 03:12:49 AM »
I believe the main threat is to your lungs, but the smoke can definitely irritate your eyes, too.  Lead free fluxes can be worse, depending on the type and manufacturer.  When lead-free solder first came out, the flux fumes were extremely noxious, but manufacturers have since improved the smell, although it's still not great for you.  (this is based on stories from industry people, nothing scientific).

When soldering, you're usually trimming leads, too, and this is probably the main threat to eye balls.
Thanks.

 


Get Your Ad Here

data_list