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Author Topic: Re: graphing calculator robot  (Read 2468 times)

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Offline triggerTopic starter

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Re: graphing calculator robot
« on: February 14, 2007, 08:19:27 PM »
Hi
I'm semi new to robotics, because I know lots about mechanics and building, lots about individual electronic components, but not a whole lot in the world of applying those two with microcontrollers and getting a robot in the end. Anyway my specific question would be about having a tutorial on the process of connecting a microcontroller to a robot and attaching the servos and sensors, then linking that with a computer to get a functional robot. That is a general view of want I would like to know, specifically I want to use a TI calculator (almost every kid in high school or college has one) to be the main brain for the robot. Where it becomes unclear for me is what is necessary for that. I don't think that a microcontroller is necessary because the calculator is acting as the memory and brain, but it would then need to output it to like a servo controller, and be linked with something that could organize and send back sensor information. Since I don't know exactly what I'm talking about or how to implement it, is this thing that would take information from a calculator and output it to servos and send back sensor info, really just a microcontroller? I've included a graphical representation of what I'm thinking.


I pulled up this on google - http://www.hackaday.com/2007/02/10/modded-ti-83-calculator/, but I don't know if it will help. Honestly, you're probably better suited to just buy a microcontroller and learn how to use it. It will probably be much easier than hacking your calc. The Arduino is pretty user-friendly and cost-effective - www.arduino.cc. Or try a BASIC-type controller, like the PICAXE or something. 
There are 10 kinds of people in this world: those who can read binary, and those who can't.

Offline Brandon121233

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Re: graphing calculator robot
« Reply #1 on: February 15, 2007, 11:39:16 AM »
Thanks tigger
       I am not planning on really hacking the calculator, I just would like to be able to run programs off of it and be able to use the LCD screen to look at data real time, like you would be able to do on a more expensive microcontroller with an LCD built in. This link http://www.smallrobot.com/school.html and http://www.smallrobot.com/scimath.html is almost exactly what I want to make except that the Norland Reasearch robot only drives around, it cant receive sensor information. I just thought it would be neat to use a TI calculator incorporated with a robot, but maybe I'm wrong and it would be easier just to use the base microcontroller. Thanks for the help.
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Offline triggerTopic starter

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Re: graphing calculator robot
« Reply #2 on: February 15, 2007, 11:52:36 AM »
Thanks tigger
       I am not planning on really hacking the calculator, I just would like to be able to run programs off of it and be able to use the LCD screen to look at data real time, like you would be able to do on a more expensive microcontroller with an LCD built in. This link http://www.smallrobot.com/school.html and http://www.smallrobot.com/scimath.html is almost exactly what I want to make except that the Norland Reasearch robot only drives around, it cant receive sensor information. I just thought it would be neat to use a TI calculator incorporated with a robot, but maybe I'm wrong and it would be easier just to use the base microcontroller. Thanks for the help.


It was a good idea--way to think out of the box. Don't let us old timers squish your good ideas!  But if you do want to get started easily & cheaply with an LCD screen, you can get an AVR Butterfly, which has an LCD screen, for $19 off of many electronic websites (e.g., digikey). http://www.atmel.com/dyn/products/tools_card.asp?tool_id=3146

Amazingly, it has a light sensor, temperature sensor, speaker, and mini-joystick. And it's about the size of a credit card. The one downside is that the LCD hogs most of the MCU's pins. But with all those built-in peripherals, you can't beat the price.
« Last Edit: February 15, 2007, 02:36:45 PM by trigger »
There are 10 kinds of people in this world: those who can read binary, and those who can't.

 


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