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ARM Microcontrollers

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Hal9000:
I had a bit of a chat with my tutor the otehr day and he was saying that 8051s and PICs cannot compete with ARM architectures.

Is there anything particularly special about this microcontroller? Apparently in the next 5 years ARM will wipe the floor with all other microcontrollers  ???

Sounds like i'd better get started with that!

hgordon:
The most popular ARM processor for microcontroller applications is the ARM7TDMI.  It's a 32-bit processor that is typically found in the 50-60MIPS range (with hardware multiply), and generally includes plenty of i/o, program and data memory at a very reasonable cost (as low as $1.50 for an NXP LPC2101).  A number of companies produce microcontrollers based on ARM7 - ATMEL, Philips/NXP, Analog Devices, etc.  A wealth of development tools are available, including free compilers (GNUARM), RTOS, Linux, etc.  We use the Philips/NXP LPC2106 as our main processor, and are very pleased with the ease of software development and hardware integration.  You'll find a nice overview here -
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ARM_architecture

trigger:

--- Quote from: hgordon on February 20, 2007, 11:01:48 AM ---The most popular ARM processor for microcontroller applications is the ARM7TDMI.  It's a 32-bit processor that is typically found in the 50-60MIPS range (with hardware multiply), and generally includes plenty of i/o, program and data memory at a very reasonable cost (as low as $1.50 for an NXP LPC2101).  A number of companies produce microcontrollers based on ARM7 - ATMEL, Philips/NXP, Analog Devices, etc.  A wealth of development tools are available, including free compilers (GNUARM), RTOS, Linux, etc.  We use the Philips/NXP LPC2106 as our main processor, and are very pleased with the ease of software development and hardware integration.  You'll find a nice overview here -
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ARM_architecture


--- End quote ---

With a *very* quick look, I wasn't able to find low-cost development boards for these devices. But they sound intriguing.

hgordon:
http://www.embeddedartists.com/products/boards/
http://www.newmicros.com/cgi-bin/store/order.cgi?form=prod&cat=tiniarm

Hal9000:
This is the one my department uses. My tutor probably gets a discount, though. It has a lot of possible uses.
http://www.olimex.com/dev/lpc-p2129.html

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