Author Topic: Help with designing an Arduino shield.  (Read 1985 times)

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Offline Hawaii00000Topic starter

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Help with designing an Arduino shield.
« on: February 11, 2009, 10:43:55 PM »
I'm currently designing a shield for my Arduino, but I'm not sure how most people attach the headers. If I just make a hole, thread them through, and solder them, they'll be on the wrong side of the board. How do most people do it? Also, how do you make small holes in a pbc (the smallest drill bit available is to big)?
« Last Edit: February 11, 2009, 10:45:42 PM by Hawaii00000 »
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Offline cosminprund

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Re: Help with designing an Arduino shield.
« Reply #1 on: February 12, 2009, 01:07:06 AM »
If I just make a hole, thread them through, and solder them, they'll be on the wrong side of the board. How do most people do it?

Well then push the headers trow the board so they'll be on the correct side of the board! Then solder where the copper is.

Quote
Also, how do you make small holes in a PCB (the smallest drill bit available is to big)?

Shops that have copper-clad PCB usually have drill bits for drilling PCB. Get some nice 0.8 mm bits; I've also got some 0.5mm bits but they're sooooo small.... I haven't found a use for them. A 1mm bit is also usefull at times (Example: the leads from some components don't fit throw the 0.8 mm holes).

Offline Hawaii00000Topic starter

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Re: Help with designing an Arduino shield.
« Reply #2 on: February 12, 2009, 09:51:29 PM »
I don't think you understand my question properly...


The end with the "x" is where the solder goes., and the line of "l"s are the header. The bottom connects to the Arduino, and the "O"s are a component.

                                          OO            X
            _________________OO______XlX_____
                                         XXX            l
                                                          l
                                                          l
                                                          l

Both sets of "X"s need to connect, but they can just go through the board. How is this usually done?
"God chose to make the world according to very beautiful mathematics."
-Paul Dirac
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Offline Ro-Bot-X

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Re: Help with designing an Arduino shield.
« Reply #3 on: February 12, 2009, 10:16:31 PM »
It is done with a double side PCB. But if you are etching it yourself, you have to make sure you have connections only on the Top layer and nothing on the Bottom Layer at the header pins that go under the board. And you need to have connections only on the Bottom Layer for the pins that go on top of the board. Why? Because you can't solder under the pins and under the IC sockets. You ca do that for a resistor, maybe for a capacitor, or LED, or transistor, so these parts can be soldered on both sides of the board. If you need to use Vias, use a 0.5mm drill bit for them and place a (wrapping) wire through the hole and solder it on both sides of the board.

If you have the board made professionally, they will make the holes metalized, so the solder will flow through the hole on both sides of the board.
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Offline cosminprund

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Re: Help with designing an Arduino shield.
« Reply #4 on: February 13, 2009, 01:52:47 AM »
I don't think you understand my question properly...
<< ASCII drawing edited out >>
Both sets of "X"s need to connect, but they can just go through the board. How is this usually done?

I assume you're designing a single-sided PCB and will be etching it yourself. All the pin headers I've seen had a nice plastic tab on them to help with alignment and give some mechanical strength to the pin. Don't let that full you, it's not that strong (mechanically). Just push it all the way to one side and then push the header throw the hole. Solder where your coper is :) I've made a pretty picture of what I'm sugesting. Number (1) shows are pins are normally soldered. (2) Shows how you can "hack" them so you can solder them the way you need them:


Offline Ro-Bot-X

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Re: Help with designing an Arduino shield.
« Reply #5 on: February 13, 2009, 06:53:30 AM »
Never thought at this way of mounting them! See, we learn something new all the time, sometime in areas where we feel we have enough experience. Thanks!
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Offline Hawaii00000Topic starter

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Re: Help with designing an Arduino shield.
« Reply #6 on: February 13, 2009, 07:45:43 PM »
Actually the boards I'm making them from are double sided, but that illustration looks like a really good idea. Thanks for the help!! ;D (helpful?=+1)
« Last Edit: February 13, 2009, 07:48:21 PM by Hawaii00000 »
"God chose to make the world according to very beautiful mathematics."
-Paul Dirac
**************************************************************
Its Hawaii Five-O. Get it?

 


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