Author Topic: Serial terminal commands  (Read 3308 times)

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Offline TrickyNekroTopic starter

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Serial terminal commands
« on: February 22, 2009, 04:46:52 PM »
Hello guys,

I'm using a hyper terminal to test a data logger... and I don't know the commands like change line and such....
which is problematic but I don't really know where to look, or how to google... that's why I'm asking you out....



Thanks in advance,
Lefteris,
Greece
For whom the interrupts toll...


P.S. I've been inactive for almost a year... Don't give promises but I'll try to complete my tutorials. I'll let you know when..

Cheers!

Offline cosminprund

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Re: Serial terminal commands
« Reply #1 on: February 23, 2009, 12:22:01 AM »
Are you looking for HyperTerminal commands or are you trying to figure out the command set accepted by the data logger? Give some more information, what are you trying to accomplish? What "line" are you talking about?

Offline TrickyNekroTopic starter

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Re: Serial terminal commands
« Reply #2 on: February 23, 2009, 02:15:52 AM »
I just need the commands... how to type them in the microcontroller...
like CR, LF and such.... for having the microcontroller clearing the hyperterminal screen, altering line and so on....
The fact that I build a data logger is irrelevant......


Thanks in advance,
Lefteris,
Greece
For whom the interrupts toll...


P.S. I've been inactive for almost a year... Don't give promises but I'll try to complete my tutorials. I'll let you know when..

Cheers!

Offline cosminprund

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Re: Serial terminal commands
« Reply #3 on: February 23, 2009, 02:29:46 AM »
Go here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terminal_emulator

You'll need to look around and figure out the "escape sequences" you need to send to the terminal application for it to do stuff. When selecting the terminal you want to emulate make sure you look at the emulations available on the terminal applications you want to support (ie: make a list of the emulations available in HyperTerminal and intersect that with whatever other terminal application you want to support)

Offline cosminprund

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Re: Serial terminal commands
« Reply #4 on: February 23, 2009, 04:58:55 AM »
Just in case you didn't stumble upon this yourself (you likely did):
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ANSI_escape_sequences

Offline TrickyNekroTopic starter

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Re: Serial terminal commands
« Reply #5 on: February 24, 2009, 03:55:17 PM »
Thanks for the try..... but.....
I feel that this is what I need..... I really don't know...have a look here to see:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ASCII
I tried both but still the terminal is no good..... really....


Thanks again for the interest....
Lefteris, Greece
For whom the interrupts toll...


P.S. I've been inactive for almost a year... Don't give promises but I'll try to complete my tutorials. I'll let you know when..

Cheers!

Offline cosminprund

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Re: Serial terminal commands
« Reply #6 on: February 25, 2009, 02:34:36 AM »
You don't need the ASCII table for sure! Because if you need the translation of the char 'X' in ASCII... you simply type 'X' and you got it :D

Example. The following three statements are equivalent:
Code: [Select]
  char C = 48;
  char C = 0x30;
  char C = '0';

What do you mean "the terminal is no good"? Give me some more information and I'd try badging together an quick demo of how stuff works, it's no big deal (I've done some work with terminals on Linux and back in the days of Ms DOS I wrote an "ansi.sys" driver that made all the Linux terminal stuff available on DOS, complete with scrolling up and down, and I've done it in half the size of Microsoft's "ansi.sys" driver)

If you're interested in some interactive terminal stuff download the "FastUSART" code from the "SoR Scope" thread, it implements an AT command set - and that is Terminal Interaction: You interactively type a command and you see the result. I even made the MCU echo-back typed chars to make it feel more natural :D

Offline TrickyNekroTopic starter

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Re: Serial terminal commands
« Reply #7 on: February 26, 2009, 07:08:09 PM »
Thank you for your help my friend.... But I found out the answer...
It was really the compiler doing the mess...
Cause print command issued both CR and LF when typed, requiring you to do add a ";" to avoid this....
Also found who to sent only a certain ASCII character with decimal so that helped even further....
To end this, problem was solved....

Thank you for your time and help...
After all knowledge is knowledge!!!


Best Regards,
Lefteris
Greece
For whom the interrupts toll...


P.S. I've been inactive for almost a year... Don't give promises but I'll try to complete my tutorials. I'll let you know when..

Cheers!

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Re: Serial terminal commands
« Reply #8 on: February 28, 2009, 09:15:51 PM »

Offline TrickyNekroTopic starter

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Re: Serial terminal commands
« Reply #9 on: March 06, 2009, 04:10:16 PM »
Thanks! Nice chart
For whom the interrupts toll...


P.S. I've been inactive for almost a year... Don't give promises but I'll try to complete my tutorials. I'll let you know when..

Cheers!

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Re: Serial terminal commands
« Reply #10 on: March 19, 2009, 03:44:08 AM »
It just occurred to me that its a geocities link, so probably won't last for more than a year . . . here it is again just in case:
Code: [Select]
Home: WWW Information: Publishing Web Docs:ASCII Characters
ASCII Characters
Operating systems, programming/scripting lanuages, protocols and text processing systems use characters in different ways. This summarizes the character set and some of the special uses of and restrictions on characters.

The ASCII (7-bit) (American National Standard Code for Information Interchange) code set is defined in ANSI Spec X3.4. Extended (8-bit codes), as defined in ISO8859-1, (Latin 1) can also be used in HTML.

    * Control Characters
    * Printable Characters
    * Usage of Special Characters
    * Special Characters allowed in names and addresses
    * ISO Latin and extended ASCII Character References

Text data: ASCII

See also: Special Character Names
          Character Usage
 There are two main codes in use for
character data: ASCII and EBCDIC. EBCDIC is used almost exclusively on IBM
machines and their clones. On most other computer systems,
, ASCII is used, so that is all we will discuss here.
ASCII is by far the more common of the two.

ASCII stands for American Standard Code for Information Interchange. It
contains a binary code for all the characters generated by the keyboard, and
a few others that are not generated by all keyboards.

 The standard ASCII set consists of 128 binary codes, from 000 0000 to 111
1111. The msb of the byte is not written because it is sometimes reserved
for a parity bit (an error check: see later) and on some micro computers
another 128 special symbols (graphic characters or mathematical symbols) are
defined using this eighth bit. Since its use varies from one system to
another, we will explicitly write only the first 7 bits.

 HTML Character References use the Decimal code.  e.g. @  = '@' .
 URL Encoding uses Hex characters (e.g. %40 = @)


Control Characters

                    CTRL   (^D means to hold the CTRL key and hit d)
Oct  Dec Char  Hex  Key     Comments
\000   0  NUL  \x00  ^@ \0 (Null byte)
\001   1  SOH  \x01  ^A    (Start of heading)
\002   2  STX  \x02  ^B    (Start of text)
\003   3  ETX  \x03  ^C    (End of text) (see: UNIX keyboard CTRL)
\004   4  EOT  \x04  ^D    (End of transmission) (see: UNIX keyboard CTRL)
\005   5  ENQ  \x05  ^E    (Enquiry)
\006   6  ACK  \x06  ^F    (Acknowledge)
\007   7  BEL  \x07  ^G    (Ring terminal bell)
\010   8   BS  \x08  ^H \b (Backspace)  (\b matches backspace inside [] only)
                                        (see: UNIX keyboard CTRL)
\011   9   HT  \x09  ^I \t (Horizontal tab)
\012  10   LF  \x0A  ^J \n (Line feed)  (Default UNIX NL) (see End of Line below)
\013  11   VT  \x0B  ^K    (Vertical tab)
\014  12   FF  \x0C  ^L \f (Form feed)
\015  13   CR  \x0D  ^M \r (Carriage return)  (see: End of Line below)
\016  14   SO  \x0E  ^N    (Shift out)
\017  15   SI  \x0F  ^O    (Shift in)
\020  16  DLE  \x10  ^P    (Data link escape)
\021  17  DC1  \x11  ^Q    (Device control 1) (XON) (Default UNIX START char.)
\022  18  DC2  \x12  ^R    (Device control 2)
\023  19  DC3  \x13  ^S    (Device control 3) (XOFF)  (Default UNIX STOP char.)
\024  20  DC4  \x14  ^T    (Device control 4)
\025  21  NAK  \x15  ^U    (Negative acknowledge)  (see: UNIX keyboard CTRL)
\026  22  SYN  \x16  ^V    (Synchronous idle)
\027  23  ETB  \x17  ^W    (End of transmission block)
\030  24  CAN  \x18  ^X    (Cancel)
\031  25  EM   \x19  ^Y    (End of medium)
\032  26  SUB  \x1A  ^Z    (Substitute character)
\033  27  ESC  \x1B  ^[    (Escape)
\034  28  FS   \x1C  ^\    (File separator, Information separator four)
\035  29  GS   \x1D  ^]    (Group separator, Information separator three)
\036  30  RS   \x1E  ^^    (Record separator, Information separator two)
\037  31  US   \x1F  ^_    (Unit separator, Information separator one)
\177 127  DEL  \x7F  ^?    (Delete)  (see: UNIX keyboard CTRL)

Printable Characters

Specials (32-47)

                    (See: Special Character Names)
\040  32 " " \x20               (space)
\041  33  !  \x21    EXCLAMATION POINT(bang)
\042  34  "  \x22    QUOTATION MARK, DIAERESIS
\043  35  #  \x23:   NUMBER SIGN (Pound sign) (see: UNIX keyboard CTRL)
\044  36  $  \x24    DOLLAR SIGN
\045  37  %  \x25    PERCENT SIGN
\046  38  &  \x26    AMPERSAND
\047  39  '  \x27    APOSTROPHE, RIGHT SINGLE QUOTATION MARK, ACUTE ACCENT (single quote)
\050  40  (  \x28    LEFT PARENTHESIS  (open parenthesis)
\051  41  )  \x29    RIGHT PARENTHESIS (close parenthesis)
\052  42  *  \x2A    ASTERISK
\053  43  +  \x2B    PLUS SIGN
\054  44  ,  \x2C    COMMA, CEDILLA
\055  45  -  \x2D    HYPHEN, MINUS SIGN
\056  46  .  \x2E    PERIOD, DECIMAL POINT, (Full Stop)
\057  47  /  \x2F    SLANT (SOLIDUS), slash

Digits

\060  48  0  \x30
\061  49  1  \x31
\062  50  2  \x32
\063  51  3  \x33
\064  52  4  \x34
\065  53  5  \x35
\066  54  6  \x36
\067  55  7  \x37
\070  56  8  \x38
\071  57  9  \x39


Specials (58-64)

\072  58  :  \x3A    COLON
\073  59  ;  \x3B    SEMICOLON
\074  60  <  \x3C    LESS-THAN SIGN  (left angle bracket)
\075  61  =  \x3D    EQUALS SIGN
\076  62  >  \x3E    GREATER-THAN SIGN  (right angle bracket)
\077  63  ?  \x3F    QUESTION MARK
\100  64  @  \x40    COMMERCIAL AT (see: UNIX keyboard CTRL)

Latin Capital Letters

\101  65  A  \x41 \112  74  J  \x4A \123  83  S  \x53
\102  66  B  \x42 \113  75  K  \x4B \124  84  T  \x54
\103  67  C  \x43 \114  76  L  \x4C \125  85  U  \x55
\104  68  D  \x44 \115  77  M  \x4D \126  86  V  \x56
\105  69  E  \x45 \116  78  N  \x4E \127  87  W  \x57
\106  70  F  \x46 \117  79  O  \x4F \130  88  X  \x58
\107  71  G  \x47 \120  80  P  \x50 \131  89  Y  \x59
\110  72  H  \x48 \121  81  Q  \x51 \132  90  Z  \x5A
\111  73  I  \x49 \122  82  R  \x52


Specials (91-96)

\133  91  [  \x5B    LEFT (SQUARE) BRACKET (open bracket) 
\134  92  \  \x5C    REVERSE SLANT (REVERSE SOLIDUS) (backslash, backslant) 
\135  93  ]  \x5D    RIGHT (SQUARE) BRACKET (closing bracket) 
\136  94  ^  \x5E    CIRCUMFLEX ACCENT 
\137  95  _  \x5F    UNDERLINE (LOW LINE)
\140  96  `  \x60    LEFT SINGLE QUOTATION MARK, GRAVE ACCENT 


Latin Small Letters

\141  97  a  \x61 \152 106  j  \x6A \163 115  s  \x73
\142  98  b  \x62 \153 107  k  \x6B \164 116  t  \x74
\143  99  c  \x63 \154 108  l  \x6C \165 117  u  \x75
\144 100  d  \x64 \155 109  m  \x6D \166 118  v  \x76
\145 101  e  \x65 \156 110  n  \x6E \167 119  w  \x77
\146 102  f  \x66 \157 111  o  \x6F \170 120  x  \x78
\147 103  g  \x67 \160 112  p  \x70 \171 121  y  \x79
\150 104  h  \x68 \161 113  q  \x71 \172 122  z  \x7A
\151 105  i  \x69 \162 114  r  \x72


Specials (123-126)

\173 123  {  \x7B  LEFT BRACE (LEFT CURLY BRACKET) (open brace)
\174 124  |  \x7C  VERTICAL LINE (pipe)
\175 125  }  \x7D  RIGHT BRACE (RIGHT CURLY BRACKET) (closing brace)
\176 126  ~  \x7E  TILDE (OVERLINE) (squiggle)


Control (127)

\177 127 DEL \x7F ^?            (Delete)  (see: UNIX keyboard CTRL)

  The characters following the letters may be used for additional
letters in countries with alphabets containing more than 26 letters.These characters should not bae used in international interchange
without determining that there is agreement between sender and recipient.


Usage of Special Characters

End of Line character

 End of Line varies depending on the operating system:
  DOS/Windows:  <CR><LF>
  Macintosh:... <CR>
  UNIX..........<LF>  (See File Format Notes for more information.)

UNIX Keyboard Control Characters
:
  The default keyboard control characters vary depending on the UNIX system.
  Most people change them with the stty command in their .profile.
                           SysV  Sun/Solaris  HP/UX
  Erase (character delete)  #      <DEL>       <BS> (^H)
  Kill (line delete)        @       ^U          @
  Intr (Interupt process) <DEL>     ^C        <DEL>
  EOF  (End of File)       ^D       ^D         ^D
  EOF Signals End of File for characters input from
                          the terminal.  Also causes shell to terminate.


Special Characters allowed in names and addresses:

 Note: The only characters other than letters and digits which appear to
       be universly acceptable are - (dash) and _ (underscore) and you
       have to watch out for '-' which can be interpreted as minus when
       used in a name in certain perl scripts.

         (1)      (2) (3)
Octal   UNIX DOS SMTP URL (HTML - allows all but <, >, &,and  ")
\011 TAB
\040 " "          -     Spaces can be used in mail addresses if the addr. is quoted.
\041  !       *   *   *     ! can cause problems in csh in UNIX.
\042  "
\043  #   *   *   *      (see: UNIX keyboard CTRL)
\044  $       *   *   *
\045  %   *   *   *
\046  &       *   *
\047  '       *   *   *
\050  (       *
\051  )       *
\052  *           *   *
\053  +   *       *   *   (URL's sometimes use + for space)
\054  ,   *
\055  -   *   *   *   *
\056  .   *
\057  /           *
\072  :   *
\073  ;
\074  <
\075  =   *       *
\076  >
\077  ?           *
\100  @   *   *         (see: UNIX keyboard CTRL)
\133  [
\134  \
\135  ]
\136  ^       *   *
\137  _   *   *   *   *
\140  `       *   *
\173  {       *   *
\174  |           *
\175  }       *   *
\176  ~   *   *   *


(1) UNIX - Any character except "/" (slash)  is allowed
     in a UNIX file name but many are not recommended
      because they cause problems in scripting and/or
      programming languaages dealing with the files.
(2) SMTP - (Simple Mail Transfer Protocol)
(3)URI/URL - Uniform Resource Identifier/Locator. Other characters can
be used but require encoding with % and the HEX value (e.g. @ = %40)
(Space is sometimes encoded as "+".)
(4) HTML - HyperText Markup Language requires 4 ASCII characters to be
encoded as character or entity references (escape sequences).
ASCII characters with special meaning in HTML so they must be encoded:
              Character Entity
 Character    Reference Reference
    <          &#60;   &lt;
    >          &#62;   &gt;
    &          &#38;   &amp;
    "          &#34;   &quot;
Other common non-ASCII character encodings for HTML:
Description         Code        Entity name       Octal Code
 e, acute accent      &#233; -->   &eacute; -->   \351 (octal) =
 ampersand            &#38;  --> &  &amp; --> &
 registered trademark &#174; -->   &reg;  -->
 copyright            &#169; -->   &copy; -->
 trademark            &#153; -->   <SUP><FONT SIZE=-1>TM</FONT></SUP> --> TM

Other HTML Character Reference Tables

ISO8859-1, (Latin 1) notes and Character List at Best Business Solutions (BBS).
Extended ASCII (same as ISO859-1) at emory.edu

 ISO (International Organization for Standardization) defines several character sets.
e.g. the ISO 8859 series.
HTML Character Entity names are defined targnet.org and uni-passau.

IBM
IBM uses (EBCDIC) Extended Binary Coded Decimal Interchange Code
 (8-bit) coding on most of their systems.
They uses code pages to specify charact sets for keyboards, displays,
printers, ... for DOS, AIX, Mainframes, ....
 Standard DOS code pages are:
    437  United States
    850  Multilingual (Latin 1)
    852  Slavic (Latin 2)
    863  Canadian-French
    865  Nordic (Norwegian, Danish)
    860  Portuguese
 See:
 IBM OS/390 Code Pages

 General Info. on Code Pages

See also: BYTE article 'Organizing Babylon' on international character sets.

Netscape Character Sets
MIME Charset parameter in HTTP. If the server includes this parameter in its
response, Netscape Navigator will change its character set appropriately.
 For example:

              Content-Type: text/html;charset=iso-8859-1
              Content-Type: text/html;charset=iso-2022-jp

       The charset names recognized by Netscape Navigator 1.1 are specified in
RFC 1700 (except for the names that begin with "x-".) These include:
              us-ascii
              iso-8859-1
              iso-2022-jp
              x-sjis
              x-euc-jp
              x-mac-roman

       Additionally, the following aliases are recognized for us-ascii:

              ansi_x3.4-1968
              iso-ir-6
              ansi_x3.4-1986
              iso_646.irv:1991
              ascii
              iso646-us
              us
              ibm367
              cp367



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