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$50 robot programing

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ed1380:
Is the source code for the $50 debugged and working?
I have a report due in a few weeks, about any topic I choose and think this would be a great way to take my first step into actually building a robot, and getting to show off at school 8)


Will a 9.6v ~2000ma/h battery be good? Got a couple of those laying around not being used.

Admin:

--- Quote ---Is the source code for the $50 debugged and working?
--- End quote ---

Yeap it works. But I recommend getting the ~$30 programmer cause I havent had time to figure out what went wrong with the cheaper one . . . the issues are all explained in the tutorial.


--- Quote ---Will a 9.6v ~2000ma/h battery be good? Got a couple of those laying around not being used.
--- End quote ---

Yes and no. The servos are rated for a maximum of 6V (meaning they will fry if you go much higher). You could of course use a switching regulator to step the 9.6V down to 6V. The microcontroller circuitry will seperately use the 5V regulator so no need to worry about that.
http://www.dimensionengineering.com/DE-SWADJ.htm

ed1380:
Will I be able to use that programmer in the future when I go more advanced? Will it work with the more advance mcu's?

Can I get another 5v voltage regulator and use that for the servo's, cause I'm not too excited spending $15 on a voltage regulator?
If anything I'll use a 6v battery pack.

Admin:
Search digikey for ATAVRISP2 and check the datasheet for what it supports. The more expensive one is better and supports more AVR's. Its the one I normally use, and I think most people use.


--- Quote ---Can I get another 5v voltage regulator and use that for the servo's, cause I'm not too excited spending $15 on a voltage regulator?
--- End quote ---
Nope. A regular regulator is extremely inefficient and will fry with all the wasted heat.

dunk:

--- Quote ---Nope. A regular regulator is extremely inefficient and will fry with all the wasted heat.
--- End quote ---

unless you research "switching regulators" which are typically 90% efficient or better but at the expense of added complexity.
the LM2596 for example. http://www.national.com/pf/LM/LM2596.html

dunk.

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