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Author Topic: Pretty blue fire  (Read 1955 times)

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Offline Blood-manTopic starter

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Pretty blue fire
« on: July 31, 2009, 08:17:02 PM »
When I was modifying my servo Hitec HS-310, and don't cut the tab completely. So when I turn the power on, gears are stuck and then my 5v regulator make a pretty blue fire. I immediately turn the power off. I seems like all components doesn't hurt, but the 5v resistor become black. Some solder melt and connect + and ground. What the possibilities of total destruction? If possible, how can I fix it?

Offline SmAsH

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Re: Pretty blue fire
« Reply #1 on: July 31, 2009, 09:20:58 PM »
sounds like the motor drew the stall current :P
the servo should be fine, as long as it wasn't on for too long, the regulator is most likely dead...
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Offline wil.hamilton

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Re: Pretty blue fire
« Reply #2 on: July 31, 2009, 09:41:03 PM »
generally if a component becomes black it's fried
have never heard of a case where a component turns black and ISNT fried
use the google.  it's your friend.

Offline SmAsH

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Re: Pretty blue fire
« Reply #3 on: July 31, 2009, 09:44:46 PM »
what about if you paint it! there are quite a few very sturdy ic's out there that can keep going after very rough treatment...
@blood-man, did the regulator get so hot it melted the solder? or was it a bridge you made?
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Offline Joker94

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Re: Pretty blue fire
« Reply #4 on: August 01, 2009, 12:08:13 AM »
even if it works get another one just incase some thing is not quite right, it may eventualy blow all  you electronics.

Offline SmAsH

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Re: Pretty blue fire
« Reply #5 on: August 01, 2009, 03:23:04 AM »
well, test it with a multimeter...
but before you replace stuff, fix whats wrong with your circuit... theres no point replacing electronics if they're just gonna fry again!
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Offline Joker94

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Re: Pretty blue fire
« Reply #6 on: August 01, 2009, 04:11:06 AM »
sorry, inturperated it the wrong way . just re read it and do what smash said, check it and check it again, And the first point of call, you soldering. If your soldering has created a short fix them. What type of board are you using. Strip board or the type of board featured in the $50 robot tutorial.

Either way get an extremly sharp knife and run it between each row to seperate the solder before you start to resolder when it may not be needed.

And try not to cut corners when you are debugging, it will only cause problems further down the track.

Offline Blood-manTopic starter

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Re: Pretty blue fire
« Reply #7 on: August 01, 2009, 06:38:02 AM »
my board works good several times, before that. The fire was like 1 or 2 seconds and then after I turn the power off it's gone. There wasn't solder that connect + and ground, so I guess my 5v regulator completely fried.

Offline SmAsH

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Re: Pretty blue fire
« Reply #8 on: August 01, 2009, 06:39:14 AM »
damn, ah well... they're only like 30c anyway...
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Offline Blood-manTopic starter

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Re: Pretty blue fire
« Reply #9 on: August 01, 2009, 06:44:45 AM »
What did you mean?

Offline wil.hamilton

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Re: Pretty blue fire
« Reply #10 on: August 01, 2009, 07:07:18 AM »
he means its not a terrible loss, voltage regulators are very inexpensive
use the google.  it's your friend.

Offline Blood-manTopic starter

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Re: Pretty blue fire
« Reply #11 on: August 01, 2009, 07:10:28 AM »
Actually it wasn't fire. Probably it was spark, because top of the 5v regulator is OK. I was lazy so I connect main power supply by the pins not the wire. What could happen if + and ground connected for a second or two? How can I check the 5v regulator if it get fried?
« Last Edit: August 01, 2009, 07:16:26 AM by Blood-man »

Offline SmAsH

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Re: Pretty blue fire
« Reply #12 on: August 01, 2009, 07:57:04 AM »
regulators have always been sturdy to me... ive never fried one :P
you can check it by desoldering it, connecting battery to vin and gnd and measuring the resulting voltage.
if you get 5V its good, otherwise its stuffed.
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Offline Joker94

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Re: Pretty blue fire
« Reply #13 on: August 01, 2009, 05:44:16 PM »
Usind aligator clips would be the easiest way to test the regulator

Offline SmAsH

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Re: Pretty blue fire
« Reply #14 on: August 02, 2009, 03:21:00 AM »
Using alligator clips would be the easiest way to test the regulator
thats how i set up regulation circuits to test small sensors :D
get some jumper clips from the battery to regulator to multimeter ;D
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Offline Joker94

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Re: Pretty blue fire
« Reply #15 on: August 03, 2009, 05:48:11 AM »
quick 'n' easy ;D

Offline guru

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Re: Pretty blue fire
« Reply #16 on: August 04, 2009, 11:29:55 AM »
Also,  before turning a circuit on do a high-impedance test on the power lines. If the impedance of any of the power and ground traces are less than 500 ohm you may have a problem. If near 0 ohm ...then definately. I typically get 1.5Kohm. Of course, if you have a motor *directly* tied to power it will be about 2 ohms or so, and that would be normal...but usually the motor is behind some transistors and so would not be measured in a high impedance test.

Because of decoupling caps in the circuit it is normal for a continuity tester to beep for a sub-second. The decoupling caps initially show as shorts but quickly go high-impedance.

If you have ever opened up devices and seen a "Hi-Pot Test Passed" sticker, this is a sticker from the assembly line tester that tested the power lines for high impedance. A simple but effective test.

 


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