Author Topic: Multimeter Behaviour  (Read 918 times)

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Offline ksquaredTopic starter

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Multimeter Behaviour
« on: August 08, 2009, 10:29:11 AM »
I've noticed that my multimeter, when told to measure DC voltage, is usually fairly stable.  However, I have also noticed that I myself seem to be producing DC voltage - albeit in tiny quantities.  My thumbs for example, seem to have a current (one thumb per lead), as does the tongue.  However, I've also noticed that moving the leads rapidly about in the air also creates a voltage - though in even lesser amounts.  Out of sheer curiosity, what causes this?  

Also, the negative terminal appears to have a scorch mark in it, probably form a soldering iron.  Would this have any effect?  Either this, or when say, tyring to measure the voltage in a circuit.

Oh, and thanks in advance.
« Last Edit: August 08, 2009, 11:38:40 AM by ksquared »

Offline blackbeard

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Re: Multimeter Behaviour
« Reply #1 on: August 08, 2009, 09:21:42 PM »
i don't know about the air but sticking it in your mouth causes a reaction like a lead acid battery. i think that touching your fingers does the same. my guess with the air is that it's either a bug or it's caused by inductance
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Offline madchimp

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Re: Multimeter Behaviour
« Reply #2 on: August 08, 2009, 10:30:53 PM »
Well moving through the air I would guess it might be static electricity and measuring on your body could possibly be picking up some of the electrical current your body produces. I don't know all the exact details since i've never really been into biology (unless you consider being very interested in women to be an interest in biology) but you body does create electricity. Your nerves are basically wires that electrical signals go through in you body.

Offline SmAsH

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Re: Multimeter Behaviour
« Reply #3 on: August 08, 2009, 11:14:46 PM »
does the electricity on your thumbs go with you pulse at all?
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Offline ksquaredTopic starter

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Re: Multimeter Behaviour
« Reply #4 on: August 09, 2009, 01:23:53 AM »
Either way I've noticed this - volatage seems to be measured accuractly near the  tip of the lead, readings on resistance are depressed - in order to accuratly get the Ohms, I have to press it against the part of the lead above the burning.  (I think I did that many years ago - my dad tried to show me how to do something with the iron and, well, the rest is history.)

I won't have time to see if that goes with my pulse tonight.  While it easily could be some kind of a chemical reaction, that'd just be rad if it was the byproduct of something not fully understood (although, someone, somewhere, probably knows).  On second thought, I think I saw on a T.V. show a some time back that said how well you survive lightning has something to do with the momentary state of your electrical 'cycle' at the instant of getting hit - and that people who have survived such encounters claim to acquire strange electromagnetic properties (such as cuasing stoplights to behave erratically whenever they apporach.)  

Alas, I'm not sure how to test this against pulse, I could look at the rate for example, but only if somebody helped me count to find it.

Again, thanks for the interest!
« Last Edit: August 09, 2009, 01:25:37 AM by ksquared »

 


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