go_away

Author Topic: AVR and PIC programming  (Read 1752 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline left behind in techTopic starter

  • Beginner
  • *
  • Posts: 4
  • Helpful? 0
AVR and PIC programming
« on: February 26, 2011, 11:39:02 AM »
I am new to this stuff and I have been looking at the files for the ponyprog, I like what I see but when I go to the link for obtaining the programmer the link is broken and I still do not know how much one of these costs and where to get one. Also I am not sure if the soft ware will work with windows 7, I have a lot of software that comes up incompatible with my OS, I still have the option to partition my hard drive and install XP which I will probably do anyway, but the real problem right now is finding the programmer and everything that I will need to smart up on this stuff. I left all my basic electronics training 30 years in the past and I am now trying to catch up with all you youngsters. No way am I going to yet you have ALL the fun!!! 

Offline waltr

  • Supreme Robot
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,944
  • Helpful? 99
Re: AVR and PIC programming
« Reply #1 on: February 26, 2011, 04:26:08 PM »
For PIC programming use MPLAB, a free download and buy a PICKit2 programmer/debugger directly from Microchip.
Any other third party programming hardware is not worth the hassle.

Offline Soeren

  • Supreme Robot
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,672
  • Helpful? 227
  • Mind Reading: 0.0
Re: AVR and PIC programming
« Reply #2 on: February 27, 2011, 12:32:17 AM »
And a lot of the third party PIC programmers have a higher price tag (up to double the amount IIRC), poor after sales service and some are quite finicky to get going.
PICKIT2 is made by Microchip, so are close to the source, has built-in ICD (In Circuit Debugger) and a (slow) 3 channel logic analyzer and can store a program for later off-PC programming.

Although I haven't any personal experience with PICKIT3, I've read about loads of trouble with it, so I'd stay clear of that for now.

If you buy the PICKIT2 from Microchip-Direct, you can also get it with one of several development boards and save a little in the process.
Regards,
Søren

A rather fast and fairly heavy robot with quite large wheels needs what? A lot of power?
Please remember...
Engineering is based on numbers - not adjectives

Offline left behind in techTopic starter

  • Beginner
  • *
  • Posts: 4
  • Helpful? 0
Re: AVR and PIC programming
« Reply #3 on: February 27, 2011, 01:47:00 AM »
Thanks for the insight on these items. I have been looking at ponyprog 2000 but can't seem to find out anything about the price for this one. I have also looked at arduino, but still not made up my mind which way to go. I don't want to have to buy 20 different units/pieces/shields/adapters in the end to do as much as possible, so I really need to have enough info to make a good choice in the end. I have taken a look briefly at the PICKIT2 on u-tube and I have considered the STK600 also. I have a PDF file that shows the layout of something on mplan2_2.pdf but I am not sure if this is what I am looking for either. I can see already I am going to have a hard time with this for a while since I am going to have to learn code writing and work with compilers and debuggers, what else?

Offline waltr

  • Supreme Robot
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,944
  • Helpful? 99
Re: AVR and PIC programming
« Reply #4 on: February 27, 2011, 10:16:47 AM »
As Soeren and I already stated, stay away from any third pary programmers for PIC. The ponyprog 2000 only supports 5 PICs and two of these are untested (see the ponyprog 2000 web page). All of these PICs are rather old, there are newer, better and cheaper PICs available that the ponyprog 2000 does not support so if you wanted to use one of these newer PICs you will need to buy a PICKit2 or PICKit3 from Microchip anyway.

I haven't used AVRs but they are popular and very capable processors. There are lots of discussions on this forum about them so do read all the threads.

A very good tutorial on using and programming PICs is here:
http://www.gooligum.com.au/tutorials.html

You can learn a great amount about PICs without buying any chips or programmers. MPLAB is free and has a Simlutor to run code. This is a great learning tool as well as a great code debugging tool. Just download and install MPLAB the tutorials and data sheets then start the lessons.

Offline left behind in techTopic starter

  • Beginner
  • *
  • Posts: 4
  • Helpful? 0
Re: AVR and PIC programming
« Reply #5 on: February 27, 2011, 11:55:17 AM »
OK, Advice taken! I have tracked down the PICKIT2 from MICROCHIP, not to shabby for the price, I was impressed, and also the STK600-- that is going to get pricey by the time I finally have all the needed items( after I get passed the first project ) which is with an ATmega 8 / for that matter it will be high cost just to get that one going, I will need to it as the circuit I am working on requires it and I have the hex code file already and it has been debugged. I figure if I get this stuff and decide I don't really want it or it gets too deep, I can always dump it on the net to one of you guys! Again thanks for the help, and I will be spending a lot of time on these links trying to bring myself up to speed, I may end up back in school as an old man in a new world. Just one other question, what about the software for these systems working with windows 7 ? I am working on checking with the Manuf. web sites to see if there are updates and info. on this.

Offline waltr

  • Supreme Robot
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,944
  • Helpful? 99
Re: AVR and PIC programming
« Reply #6 on: February 27, 2011, 01:24:34 PM »
The Microchip software tools, MPLAB etc, work fine on Win7 32 & 64 bits version.

I have the PICKit2 and really like it. If you get it also download the stand-along utility that enables a logic analyzer and serial, UART, tool.

Offline Soeren

  • Supreme Robot
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,672
  • Helpful? 227
  • Mind Reading: 0.0
Re: AVR and PIC programming
« Reply #7 on: February 28, 2011, 09:40:34 PM »
Hi,

[...] after I get passed the first project ) which is with an ATmega 8 / for that matter it will be high cost just to get that one going,
As much as I like Microchips controllers over Atmels (and hence use the former), I'd advice against starting from scratch with 2 so different controller families concurrently.

If you start with the ATmega-8, stick to Atmel for a while and when you feel somewhat sufficient in programming those, you can start with other cores.
Trying to handle both in one go, is really asking for disaster and confusion.
Regards,
Søren

A rather fast and fairly heavy robot with quite large wheels needs what? A lot of power?
Please remember...
Engineering is based on numbers - not adjectives

 


Get Your Ad Here